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Wednesday, September 2
 

08:00

Conference Accreditation
All participants are required to complete their Conference Accreditation at the accreditation desk at the conference venue on the 1st and 2nd September. There they will be able to collect their badge and gain admittance to 16th the IACC. The accreditation desk will be open at the following times:



  • 1 September 2015: 10.00 – 17.00 hrs.

  • 2 September 2015: 08.00 – 17.00 hrs



It is highly recommended that you check-in at the accreditation desk on the 1st September if possible, to avoid long queues on the morning of the conference.

Please bring and present:

  1. A copy of your registration invoice 

  2. Photo ID.




If you fail to bring a copy of your registration invoice, a photo ID and/or passport must be presented to check your registration status.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 08:00 - 11:00
Registration Counter

10:00

Welcome to the Hack Shop
Got a problem technology can solve?

We welcome participants to come by and pitch problems/share data sets with the coders and data visualisation experts in the Technology Hub.

If you come by any time and speak with the experts, maybe they'll be able to hack away at your problem and create some solutions during the 3 conference days.



Speakers
avatar for Lesedi Bewlay

Lesedi Bewlay

Regional coordinator for Southern Africa, The Engine Room (Civil Society)
Lesedi is an entrepreneur with a background in computer science, non-governmental organizations and a strong interest in social change. Currently based in Botswana, Lesedi is working with the engine room to design plans and guidelines for the roll out of the matchbox project in Southern Africa. Within this role, he manages relationships between experts and advocacy organizations in the region. The goal of the matchbox project is to create long... Read More →

Session Moderators
avatar for Karolis Granickas

Karolis Granickas

Transparency International Lithuania
Karolis Granickas is from Lithuania. He joined TI Lithuania in January 2011 and is responsible for coordinating initiatives related to public involvement in the decision making process. Also, currently Karolis works as an Expert on open government data and ePSI platform Correspondent at P.A.U. Education and as an ambassador for Lithuania at Open Knowledge Foundation. He is a National Researcher within the Open Government Partnership... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Ingrida Palaimaitė

Ingrida Palaimaitė

Project Coordinator, Transparency International Lithuania
Ingrida joined the TI Lithuania team in 2013 as a volunteer, and since 2014 as a project coordinator. She is in charge of coordinating TI Lithuania youth engagement initiatives, such as Transparency International School on Integrity, which is the largest 7-day long anti-corruption youth gathering worldwide (www.transparencyschool.org), and the Integrity Network of Schools – the first network of this kind, already gathering an overall 5% of... Read More →

Wednesday September 2, 2015 10:00 - 13:30
Technology Hub * Hall 8

11:00

Breaking the Cycle of Impunity: Why truth telling and accountability for past economic crimes matters
Entrenched networks of corrupt political and economic elites show great resilience in weathering complex political transitions. This is a result of the inability or unwillingness of many countries to tackle such forms of systemic corruption amongst the powerful. This often takes place in a context of complex political trade offs between an old corrupt autocratic regime and a new democratic political order promising change. 

This session aims to contribute to an emerging international debate on the need to focus on economic crime during (and after) transitional justice processes. This has received insufficient airing in either transitional justice or corruption debates.  Confronting this issues is a key element of ensuring that cycles of impunity involving corrupt networks are broken, or at least sufficiently slowed down to allow for greater democratic participation. Without it social justice and ultimately a restoration of trust amongst the citizenry are difficult to achieve.

The session will discuss comparative experiences in an interactive Q&A format. It will propose ways in which the IACC community of practitioners can collaborate in changing public discourse on this issue. Participants are encouraged to contribute in answering the central question: Why do attempts to challenge old corrupt networks of power and privilege fail and what can we do to change this?

Moderators
avatar for Hennie van Vuuren

Hennie van Vuuren

Senior Research Associate, Open Secrets Project - Institute for Justice & Reconcilliation
Hennie  works on issues of secrecy, access to information and corruption. He is a Senior Research Associate, at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation  in South Africa currently focussing on accountability for economic crimes during political transitions. He is a past fellow of the Open Society Foundation for South Africa and has worked as Director of the Institute for Security Studies in Cape Town and for Transparency... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Osama Diab

Osama Diab

Transparency and Anti-Corruption Officer, Egyptian Initiative For Personal Rights
Osama is the transparency and anti-corruption officer at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR). Osama researches  corruption and transparency issues from a human rights perspective, as well as a transitional context touching upon issues such as truth seeking, dealing with the past and reconciliation amongst other. Osama has also been part of EIPR's working group on transitional justice which advocates for the inclusion of economic... Read More →
GO

Gladwell Otieno

Executive Director, Africog
Gladwell is the founder and Executive Director of the Africa Centre for Open Governance (AfriCOG), a governance and anti-corruption civil society organisation based in Kenya. AfriCOG also convenes the influential network, Kenyans for Peace with Truth and Justice that advocates for and monitors progress on constitutional implementation and accountability in Kenya. She  has provided expert advice to international institutions such as the World... Read More →
avatar for Jose Ugaz

Jose Ugaz

Chair, Transparency International
José Carlos Ugaz became President of PROETICA, TI’s chapter in Peru, in 2002, then an Individual Member of Transparency International in 2008. A lawyer by training, Ugaz served as Ad-Hoc State Attorney of Peru in several corruption cases. During the Fujimori-Montesinos affair (2000-2002), his office opened more than 200 cases against 1,500 members of the Fujimori network. Under his mandate, US$205 million in assets were frozen abroad... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Michael Marchant

Michael Marchant

Research Associate, Institute for Justice and Reconciliation
Michael is a research associate at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation (IJR) in South Africa and is currently working on the Open Secrets research project. He holds a BSocSc PPE (Honours) from theUniversity of Cape Town and an MSc Africa and International Development from the University of Edinburgh. His research interests include corruption, political party funding and issues around illicit financial flows.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 7

11:00

Corruption-free development? Ensuring a Transparent Monitoring Framework post-2015
The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were put forward in 2000 by world leaders as a comprehensive set of development commitments to be met in 15 years. Yet no clear transparent and accountable monitoring system was established either globally or nationally. As we are one year away from the 2015 timeline, many goals are off-track. Corruption has been pointed to as one of the key factors undermining progress and raising the costs of meeting targets globally and at the country level.

Corruption has taken different forms and been well-documented for how it creates an obstacle to development: explicit (overcharging on procurements, the theft of state resources, etc.), implicit (bribes demanded to go to school or receive medical treatment, fee charges for legally free services, etc.) and hidden (sexual exploitation by teachers of students, high rates of civil servant absenteeism, etc.).

Yet the current monitoring of MDG progress looks at indicators based on outputs and not process indicators, which would help to identify such breakdowns. Moreover, monitoring does not happen in real time, making it hard to identify problems when they first arise. Nor are there clear consequences for when governments miss a target or incentives for when they reach one.

As the world looks beyond 2015, it is essential to learn from these experiences and develop a monitoring system that is open and allows for accountability on actions. It needs to leverage technological innovations in recent years that allow for real time, disaggregated data collection and analysis. In this way, corruption can be flagged when it arises, impunity stopped, and its negative impact on development outcomes mitigated." "The session aims to make the link that for corruption-free development to be a reality, efforts are needed to better monitor the inputs, processes and outputs in order to identify risks and problems at early stage.

The session will specifically:


  1. Identify current strengths/weaknesses of the accountability and monitoring framework for the MDGs



  2. Discuss data innovations that could improve the quality and availability of information and monitoring of progress.



  3. Draw on best practices for effective, open and accountable monitoring systems.



  4. Discuss potential models for a monitoring system for new post-2015 commitments



Moderators
PM

Phil Matsheza

UNDP Regional Cluster Leader, Governance and Peace Building, UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub
Phil Matsheza is the Regional Cluster Leader for Governance and Peacebuilding in UNDP’s Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, based in Bangkok, Thailand.  He was previously the Governance Practice Team Leader at the Bangkok Regional Hub, and formerly the Global Policy Advisor on Anti-Corruption responsible for the implementation of the UNDP Global Thematic Programme on Anti-Corruption for Development... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Angela Bruce-Raeburn

Angela Bruce-Raeburn

Advisor, Effective Aid Partnerships, Oxfam America
Developing and cultivating effective partnerships in global South. Partnerships are not extractive but should build the capacity of the partner in their own environment.
PJ

Prof. Jinwook Choi

Professor, Korea University, the Republic of Korea
avatar for Patrick Keuleers

Patrick Keuleers

Director/Chief of Profession, Governance and Peacebuilding, UNDP
Mr. Patrick Keuleers is currently the Director of Governance and Peacebuilding, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support of UNDP.  Mr. Keuleers brings over 30 years of experience in the field of governance and peacebuilding with assignments in UNDP headquarters, in Central and West Africa and in the Asia and the Pacific region, including support to crisis affected environments (Aceh, Afghanistan, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Democratic Republic of... Read More →
avatar for Salome Steib

Salome Steib

Senior Policy Advisor Anti-Corruption and Asset, Swiss Agency For Development And Cooperation, Sdc
Salome is a Senior Policy Advisor at the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) in Switzerland. She is responsible for SDC’s global program for anti-corruption and asset recovery. Currently, she is mostly involved in issues of asset recovery, specifically on Switzerland's cases of asset returns. Prior to joining SDC, she worked at the Swiss State Secretary for Economic Affairs (SECO) on macroeconomic issues across Africa and... Read More →
avatar for Cobus De Swardt

Cobus De Swardt

Managing Director, TI-S
Cobus joined Transparency International in 2004 and was appointed Managing Director in 2007. His experience spans the fields of globalisation, development policy, international relations and business management. Cobus has taught and worked at universities, multinational corporations, trade unions and research institutes in managerial and research related roles around the world. During the 1980s and early 1990s, he was active in the anti-apartheid... Read More →
DM

Daniel Mark Woods

Director of Law and Justice, Department Of Foreign Affairs And Trade

Session Coordinators
avatar for Aida Arutyunova

Aida Arutyunova

Anti-Corruption Specialist, United Nations Development Programme



Wednesday September 2, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 9

11:00

Country Experiences in dealing with Governance and Corruption
Malaysia’s Experience in dealing with Governance and Corruption

The Malaysian government recognizes the need to improve governance to support the country’s economic transformation to a high-income model and becoming a developed nation by 2020 under the Economic Transformation Program (ETP). In tangent with the ETP and public expectation, the Malaysian government embarked on an ambitious Government Transformation Program (GTP) to deal with eradicating corruption and improve governance.

The challenge for Malaysia as an aspiring nation to reach a higher standard of living for her citizens is to institute radical changes where measures can be institutionalized and sustained through a series of progressive improvements. The strategic approach must be comprehensive and holistic so that every area of government administration is girdled on good governance, not just at the top but also at the grass root and frontline where the public will have productive experiences with the civil service.

The public sector unlike a corporation offers services that are wide, ranging from education, health care and environment protection to security and defense, agriculture, infrastructure development etc. Every type of service provides its own specific issues and problems that may require tailor made solutions. What approach does one employ to deal with this vast array of challenges? How does one gain the commitment and participation of all key stakeholders? Who are the champions and drivers of change in each ministry or agency?
In this session, the speaker will share the Malaysian government’s experience in dealing with corruption and instilling good governance in the Malaysian public sector through an integrative and holistic framework.

Korea's Anti-Corruption Strategies and Experiences

Korea has successfully transformed itself from an aid recipient to a donor country with its rapid economic development. But, in the course of such dramatic growth, we also experienced negative side effects such as collusive ties between politicians and businesses. Corruption became one of the factors hindering the further growth and development of Korean society.

For systemic responses to corruption, the Korean government has been promoting various anti-corruption policies by enacting "the Ant-Corruption Act" in 2001, as well as by establishing "the Korean Independent Commission Against Corruption" in 2002, which is the predecessor to the Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission.

As Korea's national anti-corruption body, the ACRC carries out a range of measures to prevent and control corruption, including formulation of anti-corruption policies, improvement of laws and institutions, measurement of corruption risks, anti-corruption training, and protection and rewards for whistleblowers.

However, there is still much to be done to meet the expectations of people about the public sector’s integrity. The Korean government is harnessing every capacity to straighten out misguided and corrupt practices and systems of the past and setting fighting against corruption as one of the major priorities of the administration.

Speakers
avatar for Kwak Jin-Young

Kwak Jin-Young

Vice Chairperson, Anti-Corruption & Civil Rights Commission Of Korea
- Jan. 2013 Steering Committee Member, the Korean Federation of Youth Voters | - Jan. 2010 Auditor, The Korean Association of International Studies | - Sep. 2008 Committee Member, the National Assembly Operation System Reform Committee | - May 2006 Policy Advisor, the Korea Manifesto Center | - Jan. 2005 Committee Member, the Political Reform Committee of the Citizens’ Coalition for Economic Justice | - Jan. 2003 Auditor, the Korean... Read More →
avatar for Seng Kuan Low

Seng Kuan Low

Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Prime Minister's Department Of Malaysia
The Honourable Senator Datuk Paul Low Seng Kuan currently serves as the Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department in charge of Governance and Integrity. He is the immediate past President of Transparency International Malaysia, the accredited national chapter of the Berlin-based Transparency International, which is an independent, non-governmental and non-partisan organization committed to fight against corruption at all levels of... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Alan Kirupakaran

Alan Kirupakaran

Governance Office To The Minister, Prime Minister's Department
I have worked in various positions within the I.T. industry, including software development, project management, sales, business development and general management. This includes many years with a pioneering Malaysian I.T. company which focused on developing local applications and providing support services. | | Prior to joining the government, my most recent employment was as Executive Director of TI Malaysia, the local chapter of... Read More →

Session Moderators
avatar for Dato' Akhbar Satar

Dato' Akhbar Satar

President, Transparency International Malaysia
Dato' Akhbar Haji Satar, CFE is currently the Deputy President of Transparency International Malaysia, the accredited national chapter of the Berlin-based Transparency International, fighting against corruption. | | He is an experienced corporate fraud investigator who held numerous senior management positions including as a State Director at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Agency (ACA) before his optional retirement from the agency after more... Read More →



Wednesday September 2, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 3

11:00

What is People Power and how does it impact Corruption and Impunity
What exactly are people power and collective nonviolent action? Without understanding the dynamics of these related elements of bottom-up change, we cannot effectively engage, empower and mobilise our fellow citizens, support and protect integrity champions, channel public outrage to productive nonviolent action, and maximize our use of on-the-ground and online tools, as well as other new technologies.

We propose an interactive session using the fishbowl format and group exercises - in order to stimulate a peer-to-peer exchange of experiences, knowledge, and information. We will:


  1. Examine how people power works when applied to fighting impunity and corruption and the role of power dynamics in achieving social justice.



  2. Discuss the critical role of strategy to design effective monitoring tactics that can disrupt the corrupt status quo, and create opportunities for engagement with powerholders.



  3. Highlight successful “people power essentials”, including nonviolent discipline, the many dimensions of unity, and the “three intangibles” - collective responsibility, collective identity and legitimacy.



  4. Review a people power checklist for effective citizen mobilization and action.



  5. Apply these concepts and essentials to participants’ own experiences or to a new civic initiative they want to develop.


We will facilitate two group exercises that illuminate people power dynamics. Participants will be given a newly-published educational curriculum: “Freedom from Corruption: People Power to Undermine Impunity and Gain Social Justice.”

There can be no effective solutions or strategies regarding people-integrity-action without an understanding of the dynamics of bottom-up pressure on powerholders and corruptors, the necessity for strategy, and the interplay of power shifts in order to produce changes in policy, practices and norms for accountability and integrity. This session will produce a checklist for effective citizen mobilization and action to undermine impunity – that is both strategic and practical

People power wielded by mobilised citizens in civic initiatives has been documented to disrupt and affect behavior in many cases. However, this requires power analysis, strategy, tactical creativity and diversity of actions, collective citizen responsibility to address the injustice and ownership of the civic initiative, and legitimacy. The session will apply the conceptual elements, and practical insights, and strategic analytical tools from the people power realm to curbing corruption and undermining impunity based on actual anti-corruption civic initiatives.

Monitoring consists of a set of nonviolent actions in which mobilized citizens are the main protagonists. Regular people have the potential to wield extra-institutional pressure on powerholders and uncover corruption, which makes it more difficult for corruptors to operate with impunity.

Moderators
avatar for Philippe Duhamel

Philippe Duhamel

Facilitator, Viastrategia
Accountability activist, civic organizer, and nonviolent action educator. In over thirty years of organizing, Philippe Duhamel has led key successful campaigns with human rights and civic organizations, environmental and community groups. His Operation Transparency campaign design, first used to bring the draft agreement of Free Trade Area of the Americas in 2001 out in the open, has been used with success by a number of labour and civil... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Vijay Anand

Vijay Anand

President, 5th Pillar
I co-founded and head 5th Pillar, a nonprofit organization that aims to encourage, enable, and empower every citizen of India to eliminate corruption at all levels of society. We use the Zero Rupee Note and the Right to Information(RTI) Act of India, to make willing citizens to pursue any governmental work in India without the briber, delay or disrespect which is otherwise common in Indian government offices. | | 5th Pillar believes that... Read More →
avatar for Shaazka Beyerle

Shaazka Beyerle

Author, Curtailing Corruption:, People Power For Accountabililty And Justice
Shaazka Beyerle is the Lead Researcher/Author for a Nordic Trust Fund project in the World Bank entitled, “Citizen Participation is a Human Right: A Human Rights-Based Approach to the World Bank's Citizen Engagement Mandate.” She’s the author of Curtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice (Lynne Rienner 2014), and Freedom from Corruption: A Curriculum for People Power Movements, Campaigns and Civic Initiatives (2015... Read More →
avatar for Anjali Bhardwaj

Anjali Bhardwaj

Co-Convenor, National Campaign For Peoples Right To Information
I have been closely associated with the Right to Information movement in India since the year 2000 and am a co-convenor of the NCPRI (http://righttoinformation.info/). The NCPRI played a pivotal role in campaigning for an effective Right to Information Act in India. NCPRI has been advocating for a series of anti-corruption and grievance redress measures to tackle corruption and redress grievances of people - the Lokpal & Lokayuktas Act, the... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Shaazka Beyerle

Shaazka Beyerle

Author, Curtailing Corruption:, People Power For Accountabililty And Justice
Shaazka Beyerle is the Lead Researcher/Author for a Nordic Trust Fund project in the World Bank entitled, “Citizen Participation is a Human Right: A Human Rights-Based Approach to the World Bank's Citizen Engagement Mandate.” She’s the author of Curtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice (Lynne Rienner 2014), and Freedom from Corruption: A Curriculum for People Power Movements, Campaigns and Civic Initiatives (2015... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Archiwal Ahmadullah

Archiwal Ahmadullah

Executive Director, anti-corruption trainer and mobliser, Oscar
I have been leading OSCAR, flag ship of teaching nonviolence in Afghanistan, since 2011.We aim to change citizens' mentality about violence and power in our society for bringing change.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 4

13:00

Lunch
Wednesday September 2, 2015 13:00 - 15:00
Perdana Hall

15:00

Opening Ceremony

The Opening Ceremony of the 16th International Anti-Corruption Conference.


The Honourable Senator Datuk Paul Low Seng Kuan,
Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Government of Malaysia
Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim bin Mohamed,
Chief Commissioner of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission
Akere Muna,
Chair of the IACC Council
Dato' Akhbar Satar,
President of Transparency International Malaysia
José Ugaz,
Chair of Transparency International

Re-watch the Opening Ceremony here


Speakers
avatar for Honourable Datuk Hj Mustafar Ali

Honourable Datuk Hj Mustafar Ali

Deputy Chief Commissioner for Prevention, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC)
Datuk Mustafar Ali is the Deputy Chief Commissioner in charge of Prevention at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission.
avatar for Seng Kuan Low

Seng Kuan Low

Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Prime Minister's Department Of Malaysia
The Honourable Senator Datuk Paul Low Seng Kuan currently serves as the Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department in charge of Governance and Integrity. He is the immediate past President of Transparency International Malaysia, the accredited national chapter of the Berlin-based Transparency International, which is an independent, non-governmental and non-partisan organization committed to fight against corruption at all levels of... Read More →
avatar for Akere Muna

Akere Muna

Chairperson, IACC Council
Akere Muna, founder and former President of TI Cameroon, is a lawyer by training. He is the former President of the African Union’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council (2008-2014), former President of the Pan African Lawyers Union (2006-2014), and former President of the Cameroon Bar Association (1997-2002). In 2007 he was appointed member of the High level Panel on the Audit of the African Union, then Chairperson of the African Union. In... Read More →
avatar for Dato' Akhbar Satar

Dato' Akhbar Satar

President, Transparency International Malaysia
Dato' Akhbar Haji Satar, CFE is currently the Deputy President of Transparency International Malaysia, the accredited national chapter of the Berlin-based Transparency International, fighting against corruption. | | He is an experienced corporate fraud investigator who held numerous senior management positions including as a State Director at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Agency (ACA) before his optional retirement from the agency after more... Read More →
avatar for Jose Ugaz

Jose Ugaz

Chair, Transparency International
José Carlos Ugaz became President of PROETICA, TI’s chapter in Peru, in 2002, then an Individual Member of Transparency International in 2008. A lawyer by training, Ugaz served as Ad-Hoc State Attorney of Peru in several corruption cases. During the Fujimori-Montesinos affair (2000-2002), his office opened more than 200 cases against 1,500 members of the Fujimori network. Under his mandate, US$205 million in assets were frozen abroad... Read More →



Wednesday September 2, 2015 15:00 - 16:00
Plenary Hall

16:00

Plenary I Ending Impunity: People, Integrity Action
How do we trigger change against impunity for corruption?

To win the fight against corruption and promote social justice we must join forces and ensure that those who abuse their power do not get away with it. People pressure, political will and collective action have proven to be decisive factors for positive change – we see that across continents – but risks and challenges for those taking a stand against the corrupt remain immense.

The opening plenary will discuss how the global community can promote greater people engagement to understand the effects of impunity on people, and to ensure security and justice for all, especially for those who stand up and take action against impunity for corruption. It will look at how to hold the corrupt to account when too often it is the corrupt that wield the power, both economic and political.

Re-watch Plenary I here.

Moderators
avatar for Elena Panfilova

Elena Panfilova

Vice Chair, Transparency International
Elena A. Panfilova is the chair of the Center for Anti-corruption Research and Initiative Transparency International, TI’s Russian chapter, which she founded in 1999. She served as its Executive Director until July 2014, when she became the Chapter’s Chair. She has been an academic, consultant and activist, held positions in the OECD and the Institute for Economy in Transition, and became a member of the Russian Governmental... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Chayes

Sarah Chayes

Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Sarah Chayes is a senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program and the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment. Formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, she is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations. She is working on correlations between acute public corruption and the rise of militant extremism.A former reporter, she covered the fall of the... Read More →
avatar for Anabel Cruz

Anabel Cruz

Director And Civicus Board Member, Icd, Uruguay And Civicus
Anabel Cruz is the Founding Director of the Instituto de Comunicacion y Desarrollo (the Communication and Development Institute (ICD)), an organisation aimed at strengthening civil society. Based in Uruguay, ICD has almost 30 years of experience in research, promotion, and dissemination of information on topics related to international cooperation, civil society, and citizen participation. She states:“Originally from Uruguay, I have been... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Keuleers

Patrick Keuleers

Director/Chief of Profession, Governance and Peacebuilding, UNDP
Mr. Patrick Keuleers is currently the Director of Governance and Peacebuilding, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support of UNDP.  Mr. Keuleers brings over 30 years of experience in the field of governance and peacebuilding with assignments in UNDP headquarters, in Central and West Africa and in the Asia and the Pacific region, including support to crisis affected environments (Aceh, Afghanistan, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Democratic Republic of... Read More →
avatar for Thuli Madonsela

Thuli Madonsela

Public Protector, Public Protector South Africa
Advocate Thulisile (Thuli) Nomkhosi Madonsela, was appointed by the President as South Africa’s third Public Protector in October 2009 after being recommended by Parliament following a hundred percent vote in her favour by all parties represented in Parliament. A human rights and constitutional lawyer, equality expert and policy specialist with over two decades of post legal qualification experience, Advocate Madonsela holds a BA Law (UNISWA... Read More →
avatar for Chandra Muzaffar

Chandra Muzaffar

President, International Movement For A Just World
Dr. Chandra Muzaffar is the President of the International Movement for a Just World (JUST), an international NGO based in Malaysia, which seeks to critique global injustice and to develop an alternative vision of a just and compassionate civilization guided by universal spiritual and moral values. | | Chandra is also the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the 1Malaysia Foundation.He has published extensively on civilizational dialogue... Read More →
avatar for Kumi Naidoo

Kumi Naidoo

Executive Director, Greenpeace International
After an early life in South Africa involving anti-apartheid activism, expulsion from school, arrest and exile to the UK, Naidoo returned to South Africa to assist with the democratic process. Throughout his career Naidoo has worked on a various human, civil and environmental issues, including establishing the South African National NGO coalition (SANGO) and the Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP). As Executive Director of Greenpeace... Read More →
avatar for Aruna Roy

Aruna Roy

Founder Memberq, Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan
Aruna Roy is a political and social activist. Having begun her career in the Indian Administrative Service she resigned in order to devote her time to social work and social reform. She is one of the founders of the movement for Right to Information in India. The movement has been credited for getting Right to Information laws passed in several States, including the Rajasthan Right to Information Act passed in the year 2000. The RTI movement... Read More →




Wednesday September 2, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Plenary Hall

17:30

Coffee Break
Wednesday September 2, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Green Concourse Foyer

18:00

Digital resistance to disrupt corruption and impunity: benefits, limitations and dynamics
While there is ongoing debate in media and academic circles about the role of new technologies in fighting corruption and impunity, this session looks at the actual track record – grass-roots strategies, experiences and insights. Together, we can identify the benefits, limitations and dynamics of digital resistance to disrupt corruption and behavior that leads to impunity, and magnify peoples’ voices to achieve positive change.

The resource people in this session have first-hand experience in digital resistance – which is nonviolent action conducted in the digital realm using digital tactics. They have played key roles in movements and campaigns mobilizing citizens either in their own countries or transnationally to curb corruption, as well as to expose and undermine impunity through innovative applications of information and communication technologies often combined with on-the-ground action. They also have experience in using digital tactics to garner media attention to corruption and impunity.

This fishbowl interactive session will highlight the phenomenon of digital resistance through innovative grass-roots campaigns targeting corruption, impunity and unaccountability, and tap the experiences of all the participants in the session. We will examine the potential of digital resistance to mobilize society against impunity, applications to disrupt behavior that results from impunity, the need for digital and on-the-ground synergies, economies of scale, the roles of strategy and tactical selection, and the difference between an online tool and a digital people power tactic. The session will also feature game-changing approaches from digital resistance campaigns - through an interactive fishbowl format and group cross-fertilization of experiences, strategies, and lessons learned. Digital resistance is not a panacea; we will jointly consider its strategic benefits, as well as caveats and limitations.

Participants in this session will:Gain insights into the need for digital and on-the-ground synergies, and the role of context in effective digital resistance


  1. Be able to identify the roles of strategy and tactical selection, and the difference between an online tool and a digital people power tactic.

  2. Learn about digital resistance advantages, such as economies of scale, and also its caveats and limitations.

  3. Understand how people power is wielded in the digital realm to curb corruption and impunity.


Speakers
avatar for Maite Azuela

Maite Azuela

Co-founder, Dhp (Quit Playing Dumb)
Holds a Master's degree in Public Policy and Public Administration by Concordia University of Montreal, Canada, and an Undergraduate degree in Political Science and Public Administration by the Iberamerican University of Mexico City. She has worked in the Mexican government both in the Federal and Local Electoral Institute, as well as the Federal Institute for Access to Public Information and Data Protection (IFAI). She is founder of DHP* (Quit... Read More →
avatar for Darko Brkan

Darko Brkan

President, Ug Zasto Ne
activist with an idea or two on civic movements and use of tech, watchdogging the government and promoting equality and accountability along the way
avatar for Lorenzo Delesgues

Lorenzo Delesgues

Director, Delsol
Lorenzo Delesgues is director of DELSOL and  the creator of the app Proxibuzz, a new approach to citizen’s relation with the state. In 2005, he founded and directed Integrity Watch Afghanistan until January 2011, whose mission is to increase transparency, integrity and accountability in Afghanistan through the provision of policy-oriented research, development of monitoring tools and facilitation of policy dialogue.  | He is... Read More →
avatar for Sabrine Abu Sabaa

Sabrine Abu Sabaa

Co-Founder And Spokesperson, Shayfeencom
Sabrine Abu Sabaa is a co-founder and spokesperson of the civil group Shayfeencom (We're watching you). | Shayfeencom is a popular movement, working on monitoring the legality and integrity of the presidential and parliamentary elections in Egypt through the participation of the public. The movement aims to end corruption in the governmental and non-governmental institutions through public monitoring, and aims to educate the public to... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Darko Brkan

Darko Brkan

President, Ug Zasto Ne
activist with an idea or two on civic movements and use of tech, watchdogging the government and promoting equality and accountability along the way

Rapporteur
avatar for Anna Milovanovic-Fazliu

Anna Milovanovic-Fazliu

Co-founder, 5th Pillar Macedonia
Anna Milovanovic-Fazliu is the co-founder of 5th Pillar Macedonia- soon to fight corruption from the grassroots in Macedonia. She is also an editorial and marketing assistant for the Alliance for Peacebuilding’s Building Peace Forum and holds an LLM from the University of Kent at Brussels. | | Themes: Macedonia, grassroots organizing against corruption, peacebuilding, Balkans, ROL.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 4

18:00

It's Never Too Late to Mend: The Benefits of Engaging in Recovering and Returning Stolen Assets
Asset recovery is critical to restoring the trust of people in two ways. On the one hand, the recovery of assets is considered an essential way to sanction criminal actions and reduce the incentives for corruption. As such it strengthens the effectiveness of the legal framework and bolsters the rule of law, which in turn enables more equal access to justice which is an essential component of citizens’ trust in the functioning of state institutions. On the other hand, returning stolen assets to their original purposes, often also serving to compensate victims, directly or indirectly, who have suffered from the underlying crimes, enables to restore peoples’ trust in the justice system and its ability to sanction and, more importantly, undo to a point the harm caused by crime.

It is money laundering and other illicit financial transactions that enable the corrupt to hide the proceeds of their crimes and benefit from them. Therefore it is essential for the fight against corruption to make clear to the corrupt that their loot is not safe anywhere and to eliminate all loopholes and safe havens for illicit financial flows. Illicit financial flows are also a development issue, as it is a general consensus that illicit financial outflows from developing countries likely exceed inflows of international aid and investment in volume. Consequently, it is equally critical to recognise that once stolen assets have been confiscated, they must be returned to the country and purpose of origin through mechanisms that ensure transparency and accountability and that gives consideration to victims, to the original purpose of the stolen funds, and to developmental impacts that returned assets can have. Thus, the session will examine good practices in investigation and prosecution in asset recovery cases. It will also examine good practices in asset return, and specific examples will be reviewed (e.g., Kazakhstan, Nigeria, as well as future cases such as Ukraine and Tunisia).

The main objectives of the session is to present the challenges surrounding the asset recovery process with a view to ensuring that involved jurisdictions devote the necessary resources to investigate stolen assets and ensure that corruption-related offences do not remain unpunished. Furthermore, showing the results of these efforts – the return of these assets to the country of origin – will send the message that government officials do not operate above the law.

Moderators
avatar for Pedro Gomes Pereira

Pedro Gomes Pereira

Senior Asset Recovery Specialist, Basel Institute On Governance
Pedro Gomes Pereira has over 10 years’ experience in asset recovery, anti-corruption and the fight against organised crime and money laundering. He assists jurisdictions in developing and implementing case strategies and supports countries and international organisations in assessing their current anti-corruption and AML practices, structures and legal mechanisms, with a focus on the recovery of stolen assets, mutual legal assistance and... Read More →

Speakers
YB

Youssef Belgacem

Project Coordinator, I Watch Tunisia
Youssef Belgacem has a Bachelor Degree in English and he is now an International Relations Master’s Degree student. He is one of the co-founders of I WATCH Tunisia organization. I WATCH is a Tunisian watchdog organization created after the revolution in March 2011. It works mainly on two axes: Guaranteeing transparency and fighting corruption. It has become Transparency International’s national contact in Tunisia since 2013. Youssef... Read More →
avatar for Cornel Calinescu

Cornel Calinescu

Head, Romania’s National Office for Crime Prevention and Cooperation with Assets Recovery Offices
Mr. Călinescu is the Head of Romania’s National Office for Crime Prevention and Cooperation with Assets Recovery Offices since 2010, with a sound background in criminal law, high-level expertise in corruption and organised crime issues, as well as practical experience in international relations and project management. During his 15 years activity, Mr. Calinescu was involved in drafting and coordinating the implementation of national and... Read More →
MC

Maita Chan-Gonzaga

Law Professor, Ateneo de Manila University
Maita Chan-Gonzaga is Law Professor at the Ateneo de Manila University (Philippines). Her areas of interest include political law and legal ethics. Prior to joining academia in 2015, she served as Commissioner (rank: Undersecretary) of the Presidential Commission on Good Government, having been appointed by President Aquino in September 2010. Professor Chan-Gonzaga obtained her degree in Psychology, cum laude, from the Ateneo in 1997. She... Read More →
DC

Daniel Claman

Principal Assistant Deputy Chief, International Unit, Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section, U.S. Department of Justice
Since 1998, Mr. Claman has specialized in international money laundering and forfeiture for the U.S. Justice Department, where he serves as Principal Assistant Deputy Chief of the International Unit of the Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section.  He currently leads a team of attorneys responsible for the Department’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative, which investigates and litigates to recover proceeds of foreign official... Read More →
avatar for Ji Won Park

Ji Won Park

Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (Star)
Ji Won Park is an attorney with two decades of experience in government, private sector, and civil society organizations in the United States and South Korea. At the Financial Market Integrity Unit of the World Bank and the Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) since 2009, her projects include The Puppet Masters: How the Corrupt Hide Stolen Assets Using Legal Structures and What to Do about It, Left Out of the Bargain: Settlements in Foreign... Read More →
avatar for Robert Steiniger

Robert Steiniger

Staff Counsel - Public Prosecutor, German Federal Ministry Of Justice
Since July of 2014 Robert Steiniger is working in the field of Criminal Law Suppression of Economic Crime, Computer Crime and Corruption-related Crime in the German Federal Ministery of Justice and Consumer Protection in Berlin. From 2010 to 2014 he worked as a public prosecutor for Economic Crime. Here he gained practical experience in the area of asset recovery. From 2009 to 2010 he worked as a civil judge at the District Court. Before his... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Fabian Klemme

Fabian Klemme

Officer Responsible for Implementation, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
Fabian Klemme is a German qualified lawyer specialized in public international law and human rights. He joined GIZ in 2012 working with the Anticorruption and Integrity Program. Since the launch of GIZ's Project "Combatting Illicit Financial Flows" in 2015 he is responsible for the projects activities in the fields of anti-money laundering, international cooperation in criminal matters and asset recovery as well as inter-agency cooperation... Read More →
avatar for Lena Diesing

Lena Diesing

Governance Advisor, Oecd
Lena Diesing is a governance advisor at the OECD’s Development Cooperation Directorate. She focuses on the development impacts of illicit financial flows and related phenomena, such as organised crime.  Previously, Lena Diesing worked in the financial industry, conducting due diligence reviews for a risk management firm. She supported banks in preventing involvement in money laundering, terrorism, corruption and related activities... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Lena Diesing

Lena Diesing

Governance Advisor, Oecd
Lena Diesing is a governance advisor at the OECD’s Development Cooperation Directorate. She focuses on the development impacts of illicit financial flows and related phenomena, such as organised crime.  Previously, Lena Diesing worked in the financial industry, conducting due diligence reviews for a risk management firm. She supported banks in preventing involvement in money laundering, terrorism, corruption and related activities... Read More →


Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 6

18:00

Managing the Risk(s) – (designing and implementing) Corruption Risk Management Systems in Development Cooperation
According to the Corruption Perception Index of TI 80% of the cooperating countries of German Development Cooperation could be classified as highly corrupt (defined as reaching 40 or less points). Assuming that this applies to Development Cooperation generally, donor agencies are facing many challenges. Their work is influenced by external risks (such as corruption within partner institutions) and internal risks (such as administrative processes and aid modalities vulnerable to corruption). Over the years donor institutions have found measures to respond to some of these challenges, but what is often missing is a comprehensive corruption risk management system.

This session will focus on corruption risk management systems – theoretically (conceptualization) and practically (implementation). The key message of this session is: Corruption Risk Management Systems do not end with identifying potentially weak spots but need to find the right mitigation measures and responses to rectify these.

Inputs from the panellists will move from a holistic, more theoretical level, e.g. the identification of indispensable elements of corruptions risk assessments and management systems,  to sharing lessons learnt and best practice among donor agencies. This enables a discussion of both theory and practice while at the same time addressing specific risk and their potential solutions.

From this session donor organisations can get ideas on how to integrate anti-corruption systematically into their strategic planning and implementation, and how to address the most common challenges. Other stakeholders like civil society organisations learn how they can contribute to donors’ effective risk management and the implementation of mitigation measures. Large civil society organisations who support in-country projects can share their experience on how they address risk management issues in a corruption-prone context.

Jesper Johnson, U4: Jesper Johnson will give an overview over an ideal corruption risk management system and how it translates into the project cycle.

Elizabeth Hart, Independent consultant and University of Washington: Elizabeth Hart will introduce some of the findings from her study on common integrity guidelines for OECD member states. She will focus on the use of risk assessments and how those translate into risk management approaches.

Uwe Wolff, BMZ: Uwe Wolff will present the BMZ Anti-Corruption and Integrity Strategy which is binding for German Development Cooperation. Amongst others the strategy aims at protecting development funds by using a risk-based approach. The strategy also focusses at engaging all relevant stakeholders including civil society.

norPhil Mason, DfiD: Phil Mason will present the latest ideas around Joint Donor Responses. Reporting mechanisms and investigations are one element of corruption risk management systems. Yet when looking at Joint Donor Responses one often punishes the very systems on national level one has supported before and which have become effective.
Lise Stensrud, NORAD: Lise Stensrud will present the experiences of NORAD with “dismantling/breaking down corruption” in aid programmes. NORAD conducts thematic reviews for some of their programmes where they analyse the full programme cycle, identifying possible corruption risks and mitigation measure

Moderators
avatar for Johannes Michael Ferguson

Johannes Michael Ferguson

Head Of Programme Anti-Corruption & Integrity, Giz
Johannes Michael Ferguson is Head of GIZ’s Anticorruption and Integrity Program in Eschborn, Germany. Leading a team of twelve employees, Mr. Ferguson is responsible for advising the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) on implementing the BMZ-Strategy “Anticorruption and Integrity in German Development Policy”. This includes piloting the implementation of the strategy in Kenia, Kyrgyzstan... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Hart

Elizabeth Hart

Consultant & Instructor, Independent and University of Washington
I work on a range of anti-corruption and development issues, from donor integrity policies to social accountability. At the moment I'm particularly interested in learning about groups and individuals who are doing innovative work in developing country settings to strengthen the accountability of governments to citizens. What's working out there? I'd love to hear about it!
avatar for Jesper Johnsøn

Jesper Johnsøn

U4 Senior Advisor, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre
I analyse what works to enhance public accountability, and work with decision makers to improve governance and anticorruption reforms.
PM

Phil Mason

Senior Anti-Corruption Advisor, Department For International Development
Phil Mason – Head Anti-Corruption Team, DFID | | Phil Mason has been with DFID for over 25 years (since 1988). He started DFID’s anti-corruption work in 2000 under International Development Secretary Clare Short and developed the Department’s first anti-corruption efforts, which unusually for DFID, focused as much on the ‘supply side’ – the responsibilities of developed countries – as with work in developing countries. This... Read More →
avatar for Lise Stensrud

Lise Stensrud

Policy Director Anti-Corruption, Norad

Session Coordinators
UW

Uwe Wolff

Desk Officer, Ministry For Economic Cooperation And Development



Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 3

18:00

Rolling back the red carpet: no safe haven to the corrupt
What Australia, the US and the UK have in common? They are among the most popular destinations for allegedly corrupt individuals seeking a safe haven for themselves and their ill-gotten gains.

For far too long, corrupt individuals have been allowed to freely enjoy the proceeds of corruption through the purchase of luxury goods and real estate abroad, the use of diplomatic passports and investor’s VISA programmes.

Just last year, a series of scandals involving supposedly corrupt officials hiding in foreign jurisdictions were uncovered, including for instance the son of Kyrgyzstan’s former Prime Minister who owns and resides in a £3.5 million mansion in the UK, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea’s officials purchases of luxury assets and visits to Australia, irregularities in golden visa schemes in Latvia and Portugal, and China’s “fox hunt” for corrupt officials who have fled to Canada, the US, and South Africa, among others.

The G-20 and non-governmental organisations have called on countries to impose travel restrictions on individuals suspected of corruption, believing that, if sufficient guarantees are put in place, these measures can act as a sanction as well as disincentive. Similarly, non-governmental organisations have called on governments to align their “investor programmes” with denial of entry procedures and to ensure that these programmes follow a commonly agreed integrity criteria and due diligence process.

In 2016, the G20 is expected to publish a common set of criteria with a view to endorsement at the 2016 Summit. This will be the first set of international guidance on the issue and therefore crucial to ensure the effectiveness and fairness in the use denial of entry on the grounds of corruption allegations.  This session aims to contribute to this debate by exploring how denial of entry can be used as an anti-corruption tool while respecting individuals’ rights and discussing what should be considered as adequate criteria for denying an individual entry.

Moderators
avatar for Casey Kelso

Casey Kelso

Advocacy Director, TI-S
Let's talk about accountability for the grand corrupt... And the illicit financial flows that are sent ping-ponging around the world to buy mansions, jets and yachts. Who would you nominate as the worst of a bad bunch?

Speakers
AM

Ana Maria Gomes

European Parliament
Member of the European Parliament, Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament.
SK

Sam Koim

Anti-Corruption Investigator, PNG
avatar for David M. Luna

David M. Luna

Senior Director for National Security and Diplomacy, Office of Anti-Crime Programs, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, U.S. Department of State
David M. Luna helps coordinate diplomatic initiatives on national security and threat convergence including international organized crime, corruption, money laundering, terrorist financing, IPR enforcement, consumer counterfeits, cybersecurity/cybercrime, environmental crime (wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, illicit fisheries; climate change and national security),  and smuggling/trafficking crimes that impact the US homeland, and... Read More →
DJ

Dr. Jürg Steffen

Managing Partner, Henley & Partners
Member of the Executive Committee and Managing Partner of the Singapore office of Henley & Partners

Session Coordinators
avatar for Maira Martini

Maira Martini

Knowledge and Policy Coordinator, Transparency International



Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 7

18:00

Sextortion: where corruption and sexual exploitation meet
Since 2009, the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ) has been working to raise awareness about a sexualized form of corruption that the IAWJ calls “sextortion.” Sextortion occurs when people in positions of power – government officials, judges, educators, law enforcement personnel, border guards, employers, or others – extort sexual favours, instead of money, in return for something that is within their power to grant or withhold, such as a visa, favourable court decision, good grade, dismissal of a traffic ticket, passage across a border, overtime at work, etc. Though such abuses of power for purposes of sexual exploitation might be prosecuted as corruption, sexual harassment, or even rape, too often they are not prosecuted at all.

The IAWJ would like to see anti-sextortion efforts institutionalized within the civil service by incorporating sextortion in government standards of conduct and accountability and judicial codes of ethics.

Strategies for accomplishing this include:
  1. Review and make specific recommendations with respect to codes of government accountability and ethical standards, identifying gaps and clarifying that sextortion violates those rules and standards.
  2. Develop curricula modules and other targeted tools for the training that those entrusted with power receive about their professional and ethical obligations.
  3. Integrate sextortion materials into training developed at the national level for civil servants, judges, court employees, police, and law enforcement personnel.

One of the biggest contributors to impunity for sextortion is that people often do not see it as corruption. When a District Attorney in Wisconsin barraged a domestic violence victim with text messages proposing a sexual relationship, the Office of Lawyer Regulation (OLR) initially found that, although inappropriate, the communication did not appear to involve professional misconduct. Would the same conclusion have been reached if the request had been for money? Months later, after the texts became public and there was a public outcry, the ethics inquiry was reopened and OLR found 11 possible violations. When a person who has been pressured for sex by a government official or other authority seeks help, it matters greatly whether the person from whom she seeks redress sees sextortion as a legal wrong.

The IAWJ’s vision for change is that cases like this, whether they take place in rich countries like the USA or poor ones, will not fall through doctrinal cracks. Officials charged with attorney discipline – or police discipline, or any other professional codes or rules of conduct – will not turn a blind eye to this kind of abuse of power. Thus, the most important action that can be taken to affect sextortion is to get people to recognize it as an unlawful and unethical abuse of entrusted power.

Moderators
avatar for Ron Nixon

Ron Nixon

Washington correspondent for The New York Times, New York Times/ 100reporters
Ron Nixon, chairman of the board of 100Reporters, is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the consumer beat. He previously worked as an investigative reporter for the Minneapolis Star Tribune and the Roanoke Times in Virginia. Nixon was also training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors. He is the founder of The Ujima Project, an online portal of documents and data that allows... Read More →

Speakers
JB

JP Bonner

JP Bonner is the Director of Technology at Not In My Country (NIMC), which builds web and mobile applications that empower citizens to fight corruption. His technology consultancy, Unqualified Software, operates a co-op program for developers and designers in four countries. His projects in the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Haiti and the US have dealt with open data, disaster relief, community-building, and extending the role of mobile/SMS... Read More →
avatar for Engera Kileo Mammari

Engera Kileo Mammari

Justice Of Court Of Appeal, Tanzania Women Judges Association
Hon. Engera Kileo is a Justice of the Court of Appeal of Tanzania (Supreme Court) and has served on the Judges Ethics Committee (2007 – 2013) and Judiciary Rules Committee. She was the Founder Secretary of the Tanzania Women Judges Association (TAWJA), served as its Chairperson from 2011-2015, and is an Editorial Board Member and contributor for TAWJA’s publications. She is experienced in providing human rights training and... Read More →
avatar for Dato Han Chee Rull

Dato Han Chee Rull

Chief Research Officer, Office of Legal Research, Office of the Chief Commissioner, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC)
Area of Responsibility: Investigation / supervision of investigations at the Headquarters level. The scrutiny of investigation papers and   submission of investigations papers to the Public Prosecutor. Discussions with the Public Prosecutors on cases as and when required. Tabling of the results / decisions of the public prosecutors to the Operation Review Panel on a quarterly basis.         Conducting... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Nancy Hendry

Nancy Hendry

Senior Advisor, International Association Of Women Judges
Nancy Hendry has been the IAWJ’s Senior Advisor since June 2010. She managed implementation of IAWJ programs on “Naming, Shaming, and Ending Sextortion” and “Global Leadership of Women,” pursuant to grants from the Netherlands. She has a broad range of experience in government, the non-profit sector, private law practice, and teaching, plus extensive international experience. Her prior experience includes: General Counsel of the Peace... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Stan Cutzach

Stan Cutzach

Governance Director, Transparency International
Governance successes and failures, anti-corruption policies and compliance, access to information and data protection, internal communication, running and kids.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 9

18:00

Side Event: Targeting Latin America and the Caribbean: efforts from the private sector to promote Transparency and Integrity - hosted by the IADB
Recent events and development in Latin America  and other regions highlight the dual role of private sector companies in promoting higher integrity standards, by both strengthening their own integrity practices, and promoting innovative anti-corruption approaches, tools and practices.

This side event will approach these issues from 3 angles, to provide a comprehensive view of the topic:


  1. What are the most cutting edge tools created by the private sector to increase transparency in the relationship between governments and companies?



  2. What is the private sector doing to strengthen its own compliance, reduce corruption risks, and strengthen corporate governance in sensitive sectors?



  3. What lessons can be learned from the experience of multilateral development Banks in this area?




Moderators
avatar for Juan Cruz Vieyra

Juan Cruz Vieyra

Operations Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank
Juan Cruz Vieyra has been with the Inter-American Development Bank since 2006, and is currently in charge of the Special Program for Institutional Development, the Institutional Capacity of the State Fund, the Canadian Fund for Universal Legal Identity, and the Transparency Trust Fund. | | Juan Cruz focuses on operations aimed at strengthening public management, transparency, and access to information. Before joining the Bank, he was a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Gemma Aiolfi

Gemma Aiolfi

Head of Compliance, Corporate Governance and Collective Action, Basel Institute on Governance
We host the B20 Collective Action Hub, it's the place to find more about what's going on in anti corruption Collective Action, learn how to start a Collective Action, how to get more information and support from the Basel Institute and the International Centre for Collective Action. We're also interested in acting as facilitator to initiatives, link up like minded stakeholders and get the ball rolling! Do get in touch, we're here to help.
BD

Boris Divjak

U4 Director, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre
AH

Anne Helen Godhavn Lunde

Leader of Ethics and Compliance, Statoil Asa
avatar for Alejandro Salas

Alejandro Salas

Americas Regional Director, Transparency International
Corruption, the Americas region, specific countires in Latin America, the Caribbean and North America, Impunity, Transparency International, innovation

Session Coordinators
avatar for Francesco De Simone

Francesco De Simone

Technical Advisor, Inter-American Development Bank
Technical Advisor of the IDB Transparency Fund. Worked at TI and U4. Procurement and AML aficionado.

Rapporteur
avatar for Georg Neumann

Georg Neumann

Senior Communications Manager, Open Contracting Partnership
Georg Neumann is Senior Communications Manager at the Open Contracting Partnership. Georg learned his transparency ropes at Transparency International, opening the organization’s first social media profiles and blog, relaunching its website, and coordinating the global movement’s internal communication. Georg also initiated Transparency International’s social accountability initiative on technology and anticorruption. Prior to joining the... Read More →


Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Hall 5

18:00

Open City: how to use technology to engage citizens?
Open City means that the city is committed to transparency, it is accountable and it promotes civic participation. The session will showcase good-practice examples of how to engage citizens into municipal politics. 

Speakers
avatar for Aradhya Malhotra

Aradhya Malhotra

Co-founder, Skyless Games
Co-founder of Skyless Game Studios: we create video games to engage and educate people about major world issues. One of our key areas of focus is corruption and transparency and our aim is to elicit a strong reaction that will inspire people to act.
avatar for Rugilė Trumpytė

Rugilė Trumpytė

Transparency International Lithuania
Rugile Trumpyte is from Lithuania. She has been leading numerous anti-corruption projects on access to information, media accountability and ethics, transparency in private and public sectors. | | Rugile joined TI in 2011, she is also a member of the selection committee of the program “Media4change” for investigative journalism grants.


Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:00
Technology Hub * Hall 8

18:00

A screening of "The Act of Killing"

In a country where killers are celebrated as heroes, the filmmakers challenge unrepentant death squad leader Anwar Congo and his friends to dramatise their role in genocide. But their idea of being in a movie is not to provide testimony for a documentary: they want to be stars in their favourite film genres—gangster, western, musical. They write the scripts. They play themselves. And they play their victims. This is a cinematic fever dream, an unsettling journey deep into the imaginations of mass-murderers and the shockingly banal regime of corruption and impunity they inhabit.

Director:
 Joshua Oppenheimer
Producer: SIGNE BYRGE SØRENSEN
Year: 2012
Language(s): Indonesian with English subtitles
Duration: 159 minutes



Wednesday September 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:40
IACC Cinema

20:00

Mocktail Reception
Wednesday September 2, 2015 20:00 - 21:30
Perdana Hall
 
Thursday, September 3
 

08:30

A screening of "Dirty Money: How corrupt PNG cash is reaching Australia"

This special Dateline investigation revealed senior lawyers detailing how to avoid detection when laundering money into Australia and beyond.

SBS Dateline revealed undercover footage showing lawyers from a leading law firm in Papua New Guinea revealing a trail of corruption and influence peddling involving politicians, bureaucrats and lawyers.

The film’s had significant impact in PNG and Australia.  

Since airing, the PNG Prime Minister has called for an investigation into money laundering between the countries. The PNG Opposition leader Don Poyle has asked for a royal commission into international money laundering and sought co-operation from Australia, the US, the United Kingdom, Japan, Korea and New Zealand.   Senior Australian Government Ministers including Joe Hockey and Julie Bishop, have spoken out condemning money laundering, promising to investigate. 

This story was important because of the deep ties between Australia and PNG. Australia provides around half a billion in aid to our Pacific neighbour and yet rumours of corruption at the highest level in the country persist.   SBS Dateline was also told the Federal Government and AFP are intentionally turning a blind eye to this illegal behaviour so as not to jeopardise the nations’ agreement to take asylum seekers on Manus island.

Reporter: Meggie Palmer
Producer: Meggie Palmer & Geoff Parish
Organisations involved: NGO Global Witness, SBS Dateline and Fairfax Media
Year: 2015
Language: English
Duration: 15 minutes 23 seconds 
Twitter: @datelineSBS @MeggiePalmer 



Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 08:45
IACC Cinema

08:30

Assessing corruption risks in the judiciary: what role for the community?
The session will address innovative assessment tools that build on community engagement to identify and mitigate risks of corruption in the justice sector. 

A functioning judiciary is crucial to hold the corrupt to account and to restore justice after the fall of abusive regimes. However, justice sector institutions are increasingly undermined by vested powers and corruption – which in turn is fueling impunity. Corruption reduces the accessibility and quality of justice and the legitimacy of not only judicial institutions but the state more generally. By undermining contract enforcement and property rights, corruption in the justice sector can impede much needed investment in developing and transitioning countries. Only when the corruption risks in the justice sector can be assessed adequately, can effective counter-measures be developed.

The session will assess the options available to hold judges sufficiently accountable for their actions – so they uphold the rule of law and embody integrity.  The limitations of normative approaches to address corruption in the judiciary, such as the promulgation of codes of conduct will be critically discussed. The session will highlight innovative experiences where the community was involved in keeping the judiciary accountable, in particular through participatory risk assessments where various stakeholders were involved (e.g. prosecutors, police, court personnel, lawyers, court users and prisoners awaiting trial, representatives from bar associations). A number of practitioners will participate in the debate and share their own experiences with such assessments. The session is expected to deliver recommendations for developing a participatory risk assessment tool for the justice sector that could be adapted in jurisdictions worldwide.

Moderators
avatar for Elodie Beth

Elodie Beth

Programme Advisor, Governance and Peacebuilding, UNDP Bangkok regional Hub, Undp
Mrs. Elodie Beth is Programme Advisor in the Governance and Peacebuilding Team in UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub. She provides advice to governments, national partners and UNDP country offices in Asia-Pacific in their efforts to promote transparency, accountability, anti-corruption and the rule of law. | Mrs. Beth Seo has experience providing policy advice in the context of various international organisations, including UNDP, UNODC and OECD. Prior... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Haemiwan Z. Fathony

Haemiwan Z. Fathony

Former Deputy Coordinator, Judicial Reform Team Office
Haemiwan Z. Fathony is former Deputy Coordinator for Judicial Reform Team Office, Supreme Court of Indonesia. The Office is responsible to coordinate the reform programme and organisational transformation efforts at the Indonesian judiciaries. It involves more than 800 court offices and around 35.000 court officers and judges. He was involved in several initiatives to make the courts more transparent in order to prevent the corruptive behaviour... Read More →
avatar for Radha Friedman

Radha Friedman

Director Of Programs, World Justice Project
Radha Friedman leads the World Justice Project’s efforts to engage nontraditional actors to advance the rule of law. Radha’s work has spanned five continents on a variety of justice issues—land rights for women (co-founder and Deputy Director of Landesa’s Center for Women’s Land Rights), civic engagement for youth in new Eurasian democracies, and financial services for the poor (Associate Director of SKS Foundation, the largest... Read More →
HP

Hon Prof. Dr. H.C. Rudolf Mellinghoff

Judge Mellinghoff is President of the Federal Supreme Tax Court of Germany and member of the Judicial Integrity Group. He studied at the University of Munster and served his traineeship in Baden-Wuerttemberg. He was appointed a Judge at the Finance Court in 1989. Thereafter, he was Head of Unit, Ministry of Justice of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (1991-1992); Judge and Presiding Judge of the Finance Court of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (1992-1996), and... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Sofie Schuette

Sofie Schuette

U4 Senior Advisor, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre



Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 4

08:30

Collective Action – Mission Impossible or a Way to a Better Future?
Collective action initiatives are considered an innovative new governance approach that pools the resources of various stakeholders to produce mutually beneficial outcomes. Commitments are typically accompanied by affirmative rhetoric, praising collective action initiatives as particularly effective, innovative and participatory. However, there is little substantial proof of the benefits of collective action initiatives and even experts disagree on how effective and legitimate they are.

The aim of this panel discussion is to provide an evaluation of opportunities and limits of collective action initiatives.

Furthermore, the event will address the following questions:
  • Do collective action initiatives help stakeholders to overcome their narrow self-interest in favor of the common good?

 

  • Is the claim that collective action initiatives are particularly inclusive and participatory valid? Or can powerful actors with well-organized political interests impose their narrow political priorities?

 

  • Who are the stakeholders in collective action initiatives? Who is excluded?

 

  • Do collective action initiatives produce effective outcomes? Or does the compromise mirror the smallest common denominator?

 

  • How and by whom should collective action initiatives be evaluated/monitored?

 

  • How can we ensure the credibility of collective action initiatives are credible?

 

  • What are specific promises and pitfalls of collective action initiatives in the area of business integrity?


Moderators
avatar for Noor Naqschbandi

Noor Naqschbandi

Head of, GIZ
Noor is working for the GIZ. He is responsible for the 10th Principle of the Global Compact in Germany and Head of the Alliance for Integrity (AfIn). | | AfIn is a business driven multi-stakeholder initiative promoting integrity in the economic system and improving the framework conditions for compliant and clean business.

Speakers
avatar for Gemma Aiolfi

Gemma Aiolfi

Head of Compliance, Corporate Governance and Collective Action, Basel Institute on Governance
We host the B20 Collective Action Hub, it's the place to find more about what's going on in anti corruption Collective Action, learn how to start a Collective Action, how to get more information and support from the Basel Institute and the International Centre for Collective Action. We're also interested in acting as facilitator to initiatives, link up like minded stakeholders and get the ball rolling! Do get in touch, we're here to help.
DH

Dato’ Hafsah Hashim

CEO, Small and Medium Enterprise Corporation Malaysia (SME Corp. Malaysia)
SS

Samuel Siahaan

Head of Compliance and Licences Department, PT. Indofood Sukses Makmur Tbk.
TT

Thomas Thomas

Ceo, Asean Csr Network
HW

Heiko Willems

Managing Director of Law and Insurance, Bdi - Federation Of German Industries



Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 3

08:30

Engaging Tomorrow’s Professionals in Leading Anti-Corruption Initiatives
“To win the fight against corruption and promote social justice we must join forces and ensure that those who abuse their power do not get away with it.”

Education shapes the societies in which we live. It gives young minds form and shape, transmits vital knowledge and provides a unique opportunity to develop resistance against corruption and build commitment to integrity among the generation that will provide the leaders of the future. It is therefore essential that education services are not hindered and distorted by corruption. However, corruption acts as a dangerous barrier to high-quality education and social and economic development, including by jeopardising the academic benefits of higher education institutions. Corruption spans virtually every aspect of the operation of colleges and universities, from admissions to academics and research, financial management and hiring and promotion – but all too often, the perpetrators are getting away with it.

Reducing impunity for corruption in higher education can begin with simple but effective measures – as recent examples to design, adopt and monitor university ethical charters, codes of conducts and other approaches to exposing corrupt practices including academic fraud have shown. But to bring more integrity to higher education and help students to internalise values such as transparency and accountability, all concerned stakeholders need to be mobilised. The private sector in particular has a key role to play – as it relies on both the quality of research and the integrity of academic diplomas.

The session will discuss how the global community can promote tomorrow’s professionals in creating initiatives aimed at fighting impunity for corruption within higher education in order to create a merit-based level-playing field, and to strengthen the global fight against corruption by installing the values of transparency and integrity in future political and business leaders

Moderators
avatar for Muriel Poisson

Muriel Poisson

Head A.I. Research & Development Team, Unesco International Institute For Educational Pla
Muriel Poisson is leading the Research and Development Team at the International Institute for Educational Planning (UNESCO/IIEP) . She is also the task manager of the Institute’s project on Ethics and Corruption in Education. She is responsible for research and training activities dealing with a variety of topics on the issue, such as the use of open education data, public expenditure tracking surveys, teacher codes of conduct, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Khairul Anuar Che Azmi

Khairul Anuar Che Azmi

Head of the Integrity Unit, Universiti Sains Malaysia
Khairul Anuar Che Azmi is currently Head of the Integrity Unit at the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). He has more than 18 years’ experience as a legal advisor, practicing in Malaysia and Adelaide, Australia. Khairul advises on matters related to governance, corruption, integrity and transparency, intellectual property rights, medico-legal, corporate legal and regulatory developments and other related legal affairs. He is a Certified... Read More →
avatar for Ronald E. Berenbeim

Ronald E. Berenbeim

Senior fellow, The Conference Board
Ronald E. Berenbeim is Senior fellow at The Conference Board. From 2001 to 2003, he served as Project Director for a World Bank study on private sector anticorruption practices in East Asia, and co-authored Fighting Corruption in East Asia: Solutions from the Private Sector. He currently serves as Director of The Conference Board and World Bank Project on Trade Competitiveness and Integration of Poor Countries in Global Supply Chains... Read More →
avatar for Jorge Eduardo Mori

Jorge Eduardo Mori

Ceo, Universidad Coherente
Jorge Morí is Higher Education Policy Advisor and Founder of Universidad Coherente, a Peruvian nonprofit organization that promotes transparency, accountability and open data in higher education institutions. Its methodology includes the use of Internet and ICT tools to monitor the performance and financial management of university authorities, and to encourage the active involvement of youth in public affairs in order to... Read More →
avatar for Edda Müller

Edda Müller

Chairperson, Transparency International, Germany
Prof. Dr. Edda Müller is Chairperson of Transparency International Germany, which runs the Hochschulwatch project (University Watch), a Web portal inviting the public to report on university funding. Müller holds a doctorate in Public Administration. Chairperson of Transparency International Germany since July 2010; President of the German Consumers' Organization from 2001 until 2007; Deputy Director of the European... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Ania Ankowska

Ania Ankowska

vice-president of ACI, Eastern Europe and Russia representative, Anti-Corruption International
I am also one of the founding members of Anti-Corruption International the youth-led initiative that was born after the International Student Festival in Trondheim. I have also co-founded Youth to Youth Initiative and International Youth to Youth Summit where we focus on the most important global issues. The focus for the next year's event that is to be held in Krakow, Poland in April 2015 is the impact of corruption on our lives . Besides, I am... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 7

08:30

Eyes on the bad guys. Exposing the crucial role bankers, lawyers and others play in moving dirty money around the world, and understanding how to prevent this.

The session will look at the largely hidden, but integral part that banks and other service providers play in enabling corruption. It will examine how the flow of dirty money around the world simply could not happen without the role played by the bankers, lawyers, accountants and others facilitating it, and the devastating human cost they contribute to. 

Drawing on shocking examples and seminal investigations around the world, it will explore the extent to which banks are failing to uphold the rules that require them to spot and report when corrupt officials are trying to launder money through them.  It will examine if and how we should hold senior executives personally responsible for these failures.  More broadly it will discuss what can be done to make sure the financial sector and others play a more robust role in preventing corruption and other forms of money laundering. 

For more details on this crucial area in the fight against corruption, see the briefing:

https://www.globalwitness.org/reports/banks-and-dirty-money/


Moderators
avatar for Michael Peel

Michael Peel

Michael Peel is a British journalist. He has written for various publications including Granta, New Republic, New Statesman and London Review of Books. He is currently the Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times and author of A Swamp Full of Dollars: Pipelines and Paramilitaries at Nigeria’s Oil Frontier. Over 15 years at the FT, I’ve reported on both important countries and big themes, such as oil and international... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elise J. Bean

Elise J. Bean

Staff Director & Chief Counsel (retired), ex US Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations
During her 29-year tenure with U.S. Senator Carl Levin, Ms. Bean served from 2003 until 2014 as his Staff Director and Chief Counsel on the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. She handled investigations, hearings, and legislation involving such matters as money laundering through private and correspondent banking; foreign corruption in the United States; misuse of shell companies with hidden owners; offshore tax abuses; and... Read More →
avatar for Daria Kaleniuk

Daria Kaleniuk

Executive Director, Anti-Corruption Action Centre (AntAC)
Ms.Kaleniuk is co-founder and Executive director of Anti-corruption Action Centre, a Ukrainian NGO tackling grand political corruption and advocating for anti-corruption reform. She is experienced in international legal mechanisms for anti-corruption actions, particularly in stolen assets recovery and anti-money laundering initiatives. During Euromaidan protests she was running yanukovich.info campaign aimed at freezing assets of Yanukovych and... Read More →
avatar for Martin Woods

Martin Woods

Head of Financial Crime, Thomson Reuters
I am the man who blew the whistle on the drug money laundering conduct of Wachovia Bank. Why did I do it? Because it was the right thing to do and the money is directly connected to the murder of tens of thousands of people. Money is the lifeblood of crime, the banks can take action to stop it or take action to profit from it . Now is the time for bankers to see the BIG picture and the consequences of their actions. Come and learn more at... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Stuart McWilliam

Stuart McWilliam

Senior Campaigner, Global Witness
I am a Senior Campaigner at Global Witness with a focus on the role banks play in facilitating corruption. This has involved highlighted how many banks are breaking the rules by failing to spot and report corrupt officials who are laundering their ill-gotten gains through them. My work includes advocating for better enforcement of anti-money laundering regulations, and shutting down loopholes in them. It has included successfully campaigned... Read More →



Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 9

08:30

Fighting Corruption in the Security and Defence Sector
The Defense and Security sector is one of the most opaque sectors of government, yet it wields significant powers and engages in a broad range of activities that create opportunities for corruption, both petty and grand. With corruption in defense establishments there comes loss of public trust and the undermining of operational effectiveness, for example, when defective or inappropriate equipment is purchased. In an effort to better understand these risks, Transparency International UK has developed the Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index, which for the first time evaluates how countries perform in reducing corruption in five key risk areas. This index provides governments, armed forces, civil society and citizens with an important tool to not only identify where corruption manifests in the defense and security sector but also how to advocate for the reforms needed to end the danger it brings.
This panel will begin by providing an overview of the specific issues the Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index evaluates and how civil society can use this information to shape advocacy and engagement strategies. The audience will then hear the real-life experiences and lessons learned of a civil society organization that used the Index to effect change in its defense sector. Following the panel discussion, the audience will break into groups to have a more in-depth discussion with representatives from TI chapters from around the world to develop their own strategies of effective practices and institutional controls to address the 5 corruption risk areas identified in the Index. Through these discussions, participants will learn practical lessons on how civil society can constructively engage and support initiatives to enhance transparency in defense/security budgeting and how to successfully advocate for reform to combat corruption in their own countries.


Opening Panel Discussion

Katherine Dixon, Defence and Security Programme Director, TI United Kingdom

Saif Alhaddi, Advocacy & Outreach Officer, TI Yemen

 

Breakout Session Facilitators

Katherine Dixon, Defence and Security Programme Director, TI United Kingdom

Amira El-Sayed, Civil Society Lead, TI United Kingdom

Zoe Reiter, Americas Regional Program Manager, Transparency International

Chantal Uwimana, Africa Regional Director, Transparency International

Maj. Nathan Kearns, Defence Institute of International Studies, US Department of Defence

 

Breakout Session Problem Owners

Political Risk: Achraf Aouadi, TI Tunisia

Operations Risk: Peter Conze, TI Germany

Financial Risk: Carlos Hernandez, TI Honduras

Personnel Risk: Ronald “Lucky” Menoe, TI South Africa

Procurement Risk: Dedi Haryadi, TI Indonesia

Moderators
KD

Katherine Dixon

Defence and Security Programme Director, Ti
Katherine Dixon is the Defence and Security Programme Director for Transparency International United Kingdom. The Defence and Security programme is a team of some 25 people, combining anti-corruption experts and former senior military and government officers. The team influences Defence Ministries, national armed forces and defence companies, and is focused on practical ways of reducing corruption in the sector. Katherine was formerly the Private... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Saif Alhaddi

Saif Alhaddi

Advocacy And Outreach Officer, Yemeni Team For Transparency & Integrity
AA

Achraf Aouadi

Co-Founder and Executive Director, I Watch
PC

Peter Conze

Garment Industries Transparency Initiative
avatar for Amira El-Sayed

Amira El-Sayed

Project Manager - Networks, Transparency International - Defence and Security
Amira is Transparency International - Defence and Security’s Project Manager - Networks, and is responsible for building and coordinating the network of TI chapters working on defence anti-corruption. She is currently driving TI-DS’s campaign for global standards for responsible defence and security governance. Previously, she ran TI DS’s Africa Programme and before that was a member of the Transparency International Secretariat... Read More →
DH

Dedi Haryadi

Deputy of Secretary General, Transparency International Indonesia
CH

Carlos Hernandez

Executive President, Asociación para una Sociedad Mas Justa (ASJ)
Carlos Hernández is the co-founder and president of the Association for a More Just Society (AJS). He is also president of the civil society coalition Transformemos Honduras and a member of the board of directors of the Alliance for Peace and Justice in Honduras. Hernández received his bachelor’s degree from the National Autonomous University in Honduras in 1994, and a Project Planning and Evaluation Certificate from the... Read More →
MN

Maj. Nathan Kearns

Defence Institute of International Studies, US Department of Defence
Nathan W. Kearns is the Regional Program Director US European and Pacific Command at the Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (DIILS). He is in charge of planning, managing, and executing 60 international missions in 100+ countries on various topics. He also created and directed the Stability Operations Legal Aspects of ROE/RUF Afghanistan (SOLARA) Course and the 1206 & 1207 and GSCF Human Rights Seminar Programs that promote... Read More →
RM

Ronald Menoe

Corruption Watch
avatar for Zoe Reiter

Zoe Reiter

Regional Programme Manager, TI-S
Transparency International
CU

Chantal Uwimana

Africa Director, Transparency International Secretariat
Chantal Uwimana is Africa Regional Director at Transparency International. Chantal has extensive experience in the field of social development. Within this context, she worked in the area of rural micro-finance in Burundi, in Belgium on the social integration of refugees and in the Gambia on poverty alleviation. Before joining TI-S, Ms. Uwimana worked for Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) in the UK as Placement Adviser in the Business and... Read More →

Session Coordinators
KM

Kellen McClure

Anticorruption Team, U.S. State Department
I work on the anticorruption team at the U.S. State Department. Our team plays a leadership role in developing the U.S. government’s policy and action toward combating corruption and kleptocracy internationally. | | Prior to working at the State Department, I worked at the INGO Freedom House, managing democracy and governance programming in southern Africa.



Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 6

08:30

The Devil’s in the Details: Mechanics of Corruption in the Oil, Gas and Mining Industry

The oil, gas and mining sectors are prone to corruption, thanks largely to the high financial stakes and weak oversight. Of the 427 cases reviewed in the 2014 OECD Foreign Bribery Report, 19% came from the extractive sector; of the 176 cases prosecuted under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, 23% were oil sector cases.

Delving into actual cases of extractive sector corruption can help generate smarter response strategies. However, relative to the scale of the problem, this kind of empirical analysis is in short supply, and is discouraged by several factors: the cases are technical and complex, they often do not end in straightforward verdicts, and they involve very powerful governments and companies.


This panel forms part of an effort to address this gap. NRGI will present early findings from its analysis of 30 oil and mining corruption cases to identify common trends, such as the activities of middlemen or “fixers” often present in corrupt deals, or how local content provisions can be manipulated to benefit well-connected individuals. Global Witness will offer evidence from its ample body of case research to show how secret corporate structures can enable corrupt practices. A representative of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) will provide an update on EITI activities in the Asia-Pacific region, and highlight specific kinds of EITI reporting (e.g. on state-owned company spending, license awards, etc.) that may reduce corruption risks.


Other speakers will delve into a single country’s experience. A civil society leader from Afghanistan will discuss how corruption has affected that country’s burgeoning mining sector, and the negative impacts it has brought. A senior official from the anti-corruption commission in Indonesia will draw lessons from several cases of oil and mining sector corruption, and discuss how they have been tackled to date.


Drawing on real-world cases, the speakers will tackle questions including: 

  • Which parts of oil, gas and mining sector governance (e.g. license allocations, regulation, revenue collection, etc.) are most prone to abuse, and what kind of losses result from these various cases?

  • What kinds of extractive sector corruption can be prosecuted, and which are rather sites of impunity?

  • How do public officials abuse transactions to benefit their personal or political interests? What tools are at their disposal, such as secrecy jurisdictions, enabling professionals, etc.?

  • How do various types of companies engage in corrupt transactions? How do the mechanics differ when the company serves the interest of a public official, as opposed to a company pursuing its own agenda via corrupt means?

 

The content of the discussions will help anti-corruption fighters (from ministries, ACAs, civil society and media) tailor their work to reflect the actual mechanics of oil, gas and mining sector corruption, and will identify gaps in our knowledge that need to be filled.


Speakers
SL

Shauna Leven

Director, Anti-Corruption Campaigns, Global Witness
Global Witness
avatar for Jonas Moberg

Jonas Moberg

Head of Secretariat, EITI
Jonas has documented his experience and learning from eight years of managing the EITI in a book co-written by Deputy Head, Eddie Rich: Beyond Governments: Making Collective Governance Work - Lessons from the EITI (2015). Before joining the EITI in 2007, Jonas was a Senior Advisor to the UN Global Compact. Prior to that, he was Director Corporate Policy and Practice at the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum, London, which... Read More →
JN

Javed Noorani

Natural Resource Monitoring Network
MS

Matthieu Salomon

Asia-Pacific / Myanmar Manager, Natural Resource Governance Institute (Nrgi)
GS

Giri Suprapdiono

Director of Gratification, KPK (Corruption Eradication Commission)

Session Coordinators
AG

Alexandra Gillies

Natural Resource Governance Institute


TI PP pdf

Thursday September 3, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 5

09:00

A screening of "Death of a Gentleman" – Preview Screening

A hard-hitting documentary for cricket fans and non-fans alike. Journalists Sam Collins and Jarrod Kimber set off on a journey to follow a hunch that the 140-year-old game of Test Cricket is under threat of extinction, only to stumble on something more sinister than they could ever have imagined. During their thrilling three-year journey they criss-cross the globe from London to Australia, from India to Dubai and back again, during which they meet players, the game’s administrators, fans and controversial cricket financiers, resulting in a film that is about much more than cricket. This is a film about passion, about money, about power and standing up for what you care about before it is too late.

Directors: Sam Collins, Jarrod Kimber, Johnny Blank
Producer: Sam Collins
Year: 2015
Language: English
Duration: 97 minutes 



Thursday September 3, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
IACC Cinema

09:00

What you need to know about Open Data
Heard a lot about open data lately, but not sure what the fuzz is all about? Come to the training that will introduce basics of open data: standards, terminology, reuse methods etc. accompanied with good practice examples. Participants will be invited to share their experience, feel free to bring data sets if you'd like to explore working with coders and data vis experts on the spot.



Speakers
avatar for Eric Barrett

Eric Barrett

Executive Director, JumpStart Georgia
Eric hails from Houston, Texas. In 2005 he moved to Tbilisi to study and found a home. Since then he has worked with a variety of local organizations, including Transparency International Georgia. Since 2011, he has directed JumpStart Georgia with the goal of pushing the boundaries on how civil society can communicate information and data to engage audiences and achieve goals. Using open-source technologies as well as a design-oriented... Read More →
avatar for Nisha Thompson

Nisha Thompson

Director, Data{Meet}, Datameet
Nisha Thompson has a background in online community organizing. She has worked for the Sunlight Foundation in Washington DC, with online communities to use US government data to hold elected officials accountable. She moved to Bangalore in October 2010 where contributed to a research report on Open Government Data in India for the Centre for Internet and Society. Then was manager of the Data Project for Arghyam, a Trust... Read More →



Thursday September 3, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Technology Hub * Hall 8

10:30

Coffee Break
Thursday September 3, 2015 10:30 - 11:00
Green Concourse Foyer

11:00

A screening of "Virunga"
VIRUNGA is the incredible true story of a group of brave people risking their lives to build a better future in a part of Africa the world's forgotten and a gripping expose of the realities of life in the Congo.

In the forested depths of eastern Congo lies Virunga National Park, one of the most bio-diverse places on Earth and home to the planet’s last remaining mountain gorillas. In this wild, but enchanted environment, a small and embattled team of park rangers - including an ex-child soldier turned ranger, a caretaker of orphan gorillas and a dedicated conservationist - protect this UNESCO world heritage site from armed militia, poachers and the dark forces struggling to control Congo's rich natural resources. When the newly formed M23 rebel group declares war, a new conflict threatens the lives and stability of everyone and everything they've worked so hard to protect, with the filmmakers and the film’s participants caught in the crossfire.

A powerful combination of investigative journalism and nature documentary, VIRUNGA is the incredible true story of a group of courageous people risking their lives to build a better future in a part of Africa the world’s forgotten, and a gripping exposé of the realities of life in the Congo.

Director/Producer: Orlando von Einsiedel
Producer: Joanna Natasegara
Executive producer: Leonardo DiCaprio
Year: 2014
Language: French and English with English subtitles
Duration: 100 minutes


Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 12:40
IACC Cinema

11:00

Behind bars: bringing perpetrators of grand corruption to justice
Exemption from prosecution of acts of grand corruption can no longer continue. The abuse of political power to siphon millions of dollars from public coffers is an endemic problem in every region of the globe. The Arab Spring resulted in the downfall of several dogmatic political leaders and highlighted the extensive abuse of public funds for personal gain. We are now seeing a similar and equally devastating fate in Ukraine. A recent study from Global Financial Integrity found that from 2002 to 2012 developing countries lost US$5.9 trillion to illicit outflows. Imagine if these funds never left their rightful place. Imagine if these funds were handled with transparent fiscal and institutional mechanisms and honest, law abiding leaders. How many lives would have been improved and raised out of abject poverty?

In 2013 GOPAC members unanimously mandated the organization to establish grand corruption as a crime of international law to enable international institutions and alliances to prosecute the guilty. Further to this end a bold Declaration emerged at the fifth Forum of Parliamentarians, held at the fifth Conference of States Parties to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, where GOPAC members resolved to encourage states, the United Nations, and international institutions to develop additional international mechanisms to apprehend, prosecute, judge, and sentence those who have committed crimes of grand corruption.

These commitments set in motion the steps necessary to fight impunity for corruption at an international level. However, GOPAC and our members recognise that this is only the beginning. To successfully prosecute and punish the most egregious forms of corruption, we need collaboration from the international community and civil society.

This session will facilitate a discussion to shape and further concretize an international mechanism which would try those that are guilty of political corruption. It would ask a broad group of stakeholders - legislators, civil society and citizens – to design a solution to end impunity for corruption by creating an international mechanism that would equate grand corruption with a crime against humanity.

In the lead up to the 16th IACC GOPAC will launch a global campaign calling on citizens, civil society, legislators and governments to compel international institutions to prosecute crimes of "grand corruption" as crimes against humanity.

Moderators
avatar for John Hyde

John Hyde

Chair, Oceania, Global Org Of Parliamentarians Against Corruption
Chair, GOPAC Oceania | Treasurer and Executive Member, GOPAC (Ottawa, Canada) | Anti-Corruption Consultant, UNDP (UN Pacific Anti-Corruption Project)

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Alley

Patrick Alley

Director, Global Witness
Patrick Alley is a Co-founder and Director of Global Witness, which focuses on preventing conflict and corruption arising from the use of natural resources. Mr. Alley focuses on tackling the trade in Conflict Resources (natural resource trade that can cause, perpetuate and fund conflict). In particular Mr. Alley works on the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia and Cote d’Ivoire, and also leads Global Witness’ campaign against industrial... Read More →
avatar for Akaash Maharaj

Akaash Maharaj

Chief Executive Officer, Global Org Of Parliamentarians Against Corruption
One of our key priorities is international prosecution of Grand Corruption: http://gop.ac/19ALtTW | The Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC), is an international institution of legislators, working together to combat corruption, strengthen democracy, and uphold the rule of law. GOPAC has full national chapters in 56 parliaments, and individual parliamentary members in nearly every country of the world.
avatar for Jose Ugaz

Jose Ugaz

Chair, Transparency International
José Carlos Ugaz became President of PROETICA, TI’s chapter in Peru, in 2002, then an Individual Member of Transparency International in 2008. A lawyer by training, Ugaz served as Ad-Hoc State Attorney of Peru in several corruption cases. During the Fujimori-Montesinos affair (2000-2002), his office opened more than 200 cases against 1,500 members of the Fujimori network. Under his mandate, US$205 million in assets were frozen abroad... Read More →

Session Coordinators
Rapporteur
avatar for Stan Cutzach

Stan Cutzach

Governance Director, Transparency International
Governance successes and failures, anti-corruption policies and compliance, access to information and data protection, internal communication, running and kids.


Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 4

11:00

Fighting Corruption by Authorities: What worked and what went wrong
The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) will host a panel discussion on the topic “Fighting corruption by authorities – What worked and what went wrong.” at the 16th IACC in Putrajaya, Malaysia.

This workshop is designed to bring together current and former anti-corruption practitioners from Asian region and an international expert on corruption to share not only their experiences and observations in regards to time- tested anti-corruption strategies, laws and regulations that have been implemented or put in place in their organizations as well as some concerns or pitfalls which should be reviewed and avoided by all anti-corruption authorities.

Synopsis:

Efforts in fighting corruption by Anti-Corruption Authorities (ACAs) vary from one country to another. Some are more successful than others and some have failed to live up to expectations. Why this so? Are there areas where ACAs need to revolutionize their practices? Have those ACAs which have been successful in the fight against corruption done enough? If so, why are there still corruption? Apart from factors like political will, strong legal frame work, social society engagements or cooperation from people, what else does an ACA need to do in order to revolutionize current strategies and measures put in place domestically and internationally?

The aim of this panel discussion is to provide an evaluation of strategies and limitations in fighting corruption by authorities.

Objectives:

With this invaluable wealth of knowledge and insights imparted at the Conference by the anti-corruption fighters, the workshop hopes to achive the following objectives:


  • To identify effective domestic and international measures and plans in meeting challenges

  • To unfold success stories and the problems faced by ACAs and learn from each other’s strengths and weaknesses in order to improve our current and also future strategies

  • To indentify whether the claim that fighting corruption by authorities are particularly inclusive and participatory valid? Or can powerful actors with well-organized political interests impose their narrow political priorities?

  • To identify who are the stakeholders in ACAs. Who is excluded?

  • To identify by how and by whom should ACAs be evaluated/monitored

  • To identify how can we ensure the credibility of initiatives of ACAs

  • To identify what are specific promises and pitfalls of initiatives of ACAs in the area of business integrity


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Honourable Datuk Hj Mustafar Ali

Honourable Datuk Hj Mustafar Ali

Deputy Chief Commissioner for Prevention, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC)
Datuk Mustafar Ali is the Deputy Chief Commissioner in charge of Prevention at the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission.
DL

Daniel Li Ming Chak

Former Deputy Commissioner, Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) Hong Kong
avatar for Michael Hershman

Michael Hershman

Council Member, International Anti-Corruption Conference
Michael Hershman, President and CEO, The Fairfax Group, is an internationally recognized expert on matters relating to transparency, accountability, governance and security. The Fairfax Group, founded in 1983, has been retained by governments, corporations and international financial institutions to assist on matters relating to the conduct of senior-level officials and/or the entities with which they do business. In December 2006, Mr. Hershman... Read More →
DP

Dato Paduka Haji Muhammad Juanda bin Haji A Rashid

Director, The Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB) Brunei

Session Coordinators
avatar for Shamina binti Ali

Shamina binti Ali

Assistant Commissioner, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commision



Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 3

11:00

Open Government Partnership town hall debate
Exploring the Open Government Partnership

This session will offer an introduction to and reflection on the Open Government Partnership. In a 2 hour conversation with key government and civil society open government reformers – many of them OGP champions from the early days - it will take stock of where we are after 4 years and use those insights to sketch the challenges and opportunities for the next four years.

Leading questions to guide reflection include: What does the global OGP report card look like? What have been the core challenges to tackle? When is a platform like OGP the right tool and when not? Have governments really opened up policy making? How do we get more complex topics into the Action Plans? Are citizens already seeing a difference in their lives? Are there patterns of success (or failure) that are starting to emerge?

Leading questions for looking ahead include: What are the global trends ahead that we need to take into account? How can we counter the threat of closing civic space? How do we spread the virus of openness – how do we get more ministries, more civil servants and more politicians engaged? How about judiciary? Parliaments? Local government? Cities? How do we get more politically challenging topics into the Action Plans?

In summary: an open and energetic conversation both among panelists and with audience on where we are and where we can head with OGP and with open government reform across the globe.

Speakers:
  1. Kuntoro Mangkusubroto (Former Head of the President's Delivery Unit for Development Monitoring and Oversight, Founder of the Indonesia Institute of Deliverology (IDeA))
  2. Richard Bon Moya (Under Secretary of the Philippines Department of Budget and Management)
  3. Nikhil Dey (Social Activist, MKSS, India)
  4. Giorgi Klidiashvili (Founder and Director, Institute for Development of Freedom of Information, Georgia)
  5. Elizabeth Ungar (Executive Director, Transparency International Colombia and TI Board Member)
  6. Paul Maassen (Director, Civil Society Engagement, OGP Support Unit)

Discussants:
  1. Vitus Azeem (Executive Director, Ghana Integrity Initiative)
  2. Natalia Soebagjo (Executive Director, Centre for the Study of Governance & Chair of Transparency International Indonesia Board)
  3. Eduardo Bohorquez (Executive Director, Transparency International Mexico)
  4. Anastasiya Kozlovtseva (Manager, International Relations Department, Transparency International Ukraine)
  5. Samuel Rotta  (Sub-Director, Proetica, Peru)

Moderators
MH

Masjaliza Hamzah

Malaysiakini
Sub-editor, Malaysiakini

Speakers
VA

Vitus Azeem

Executive Director, Ghana Integrity Initiative
avatar for Eduardo Bohórquez

Eduardo Bohórquez

Director, Transparencia Mexicana
Eduardo Bohórquez es Director de Transparencia Mexicana, capítulo de Transparencia Internacional en México. En 2009 diseñó el "Mecanismo de Participación Social en Guarderías" y que en 2015 obtuvo uno de los reconocimientos del Premio de Gobierno Abierto. Recientemente coordinó el libro "Opening Parliaments", sobre la apertura de los Congresos en el mundo. Es miembro del Consejo Asesor de Datos Abiertos del Gobierno de México y de la... Read More →
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Nikhil Dey

Social Activist, Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan
avatar for Giorgi Kldiashvili

Giorgi Kldiashvili

Director, Institute For Development Of Freedom Of Informatio
Giorgi Kldiashvili is a founding member and Director of the Institute for Development of Freedom of Information (IDFI). He has over six years of experience working on good and democratic governance. Giorgi has been carrying out projects, studies and assessments for different international organizations and foundations. He is the director and coordinator of existing projects at IDFI. Giorgi Kldiashvili is an author of a number of publications... Read More →
AK

Anastasiya Kozlovtseva

Manager, International Relations Department, Transparency International Ukraine
KM

Kuntoro Mangkusubroto

Former Head of the President's Delivery Unit for Development Monitoring and Oversight, Founder of the Indonesia Institute of Deliverology (IDeA), Indonesia Institute Of Deliverology
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Richard Bon Moya

Under Secretary, Philippines Department of Budget and Management
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Samuel Rotta

Sub-Director, PROETICA
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Natalia Soebagjo

Board Of Directors, Transparency International
EU

Elizabeth Unger

Executive Director, Transparency International Colombia

Session Coordinators
avatar for Paul Maassen

Paul Maassen

Director, Civil Society Engagement, Open Government Partnership
Paul Maassen is Director for Civil Society Engagement at the Open Government Partnership. His team supports in all participating and aspiring countries to understand and strategically use OGP. He previously worked as Head of Finance and Partnerships for WWF International' Global Climate & Energy Initiative and with Dutch development organisation Hivos as programme manager for the global ICT & Media programme. He was involved in the... Read More →
avatar for Zoe Reiter

Zoe Reiter

Regional Programme Manager, TI-S
Transparency International



Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 6

11:00

Rooting out impunity and strengthening integrity in the construction sector
The aim of the session is to explore the factors giving rise to impunity in the construction sector and to discuss practical measures aimed at overcoming them. This will be achieved through meeting the following objectives:

1. Summarise the challenges of fighting corruption and improving integrity in the construction sector
2. Explore lessons from recent practical efforts (e.g. CoST and Open Contracting)
3. Explore the different perspectives of government, industry and civil society with regard to the challenges

Corruption in construction costs lives and wastes money. Poorly constructed buildings cause ill health and in extreme cases, such as when they collapse, injury and death. Wastage results in poor infrastructure and services which impacts disproportionately on poor and marginalised people. Impunity is the result inter alia of (1) opaque systems and procedures; (2) every construction project being unique; (3) it being easy to hide shoddy work and (4) complex supply chains and contractual relationships.

The session will appeal to policy-makers and practitioners from a range of different perspectives including: (1) investors: (2) contractors, consultants and others working in the industry: (3) CSOs which are active in public service delivery, governance and specific industry sectors (e.g. water and sanitation and transport); (4) those involved in data management and (5) trade unions.

The discussion will produce practical suggestions aimed at rooting out impunity and improving integrity. The suggestions will be written up and widely circulated amongst those who could potentially put them into practice. CoST will share them with the 12 countries currently participating in the programme and depending on their relevance, use them as the basis for briefing notes and incorporate them into the various tools and approaches used to build capacity in participating countries. Panellists will be encouraged to write blogs and incorporate the suggestions into their own work.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Card

Robert Card

President & CEO, Snc Lavalin
Robert (Bob) Card is the President & CEO of SNC-Lavalin, one of the world's largest engineering, construction, operations and asset investment firms with 40,000 employees and nearly $10 billion in revenue. He also serves as a member of the Board of Directors. The firm operates in nearly 100 countries through its major business units including Mining & Metallurgy, Power, Hydrocarbons & Chemicals, Infrastructure & Construction... Read More →
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Dato’ Sri Ir Judin Abdul Karim

Chief Executive, Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB, Malaysia)
Dato’ Sri Judin started his career in Public Works Department (PWD) of Malaysia in 1978 where he has progressively moved up the hierarchy to ultimately become the Director General of PWD for 4 years. He has a BSc. (Hons) Civil Engineering from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, UK, MSc. in Structural Engineering and a Ph.D in Civil Engineering from the University of Southern California. He was also awarded the... Read More →
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Vincent Lazatin

Chair, Construction Sector Transparency Initiative
Vincent Lazatin is the Executive Director of the Transparency and Accountability Network (Philippines) and Chair of the CoST Philippines Multi-Stakeholder Group (MSG).
PM

Phil Mason

Senior Anti-Corruption Advisor, Department For International Development
Phil Mason – Head Anti-Corruption Team, DFID | | Phil Mason has been with DFID for over 25 years (since 1988). He started DFID’s anti-corruption work in 2000 under International Development Secretary Clare Short and developed the Department’s first anti-corruption efforts, which unusually for DFID, focused as much on the ‘supply side’ – the responsibilities of developed countries – as with work in developing countries. This... Read More →
avatar for Man Shing Tse

Man Shing Tse

Director Of Corruption Prevention, Icac, Hong Kong
Mr Tse is the Director of Corruption Prevention of the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) in Hong Kong.  He joined the civil service in 1977 and has since worked in various government offices covering a wide spectrum of service areas.  Mr Tse has extensive public administration experience in human resources management, planning and development of community facilities, law enforcement in connection with healthcare, and... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Petter Matthews

Petter Matthews

Executive Director, Cost
I am a built environment and international development specialist with over thirty years’ experience. Currently I am Executive Director of the Construction Sector Transparency (CoST) initiative and Executive Director of Engineers Against Poverty. I started my career in the UK construction industry as an apprentice served bricklayer, foreman and construction manager. My work in international development began in 1989 as a Construction Manager... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Bernadine Fernz

Bernadine Fernz

Policy Advisor, CoST International
Bernadine Fernz is a qualified barrister and specialises in good governance, transparency and accountability, and sustainability policy and practice. | | Since 2012, Bernadine has played a key role as Policy Advisor to the CoST International Secretariat. She is responsible for establishing and developing country programmes in partnership with both international and local stakeholders across government, industry, civil society and... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 9

11:00

Six changes to improve whistleblowing overnight
This panel will examine the state of whistleblower protections for government workers around the world and the vulnerabilities of the journalists on whom they rely to give voice to their disclosures. The speakers will identify processes that seem effective, as well as those that do not appear to work so well. The panel will present a series of recommendations for strengthening the protections provided to public sector employees in different settings and describe how they might best be implemented.

We recognize that whistleblowers in different sectors – defence, intelligence, finance, health care, transportation, etc. – require different protection measures, but we believe that certain safeguards are fundamental. A whistleblower must have access to an independent adjudicative forum in which to bring a claim of reprisal and access to a free press that gives voice to the whistleblower's disclosure.

As governments around the world privatized and outsourced functions once performed by the public sector, public expenditures became more difficult to monitor. At the same time, globalization increased the geographic reach of much economic activity, so that criminal conduct now frequently transcends national borders. As privatization spread in sector after sector the public interest at the international level came to be represented and defended only by whistleblowers and journalists. Protections for both, however, are often confined to national settings and are inadequate as shields from reprisal.

In brief, illegality, corruption and fraud can be obscured by moving the actions behind the shield of proprietary information, moving the proceeds offshore, or both. The public therefore depends on whistleblowers for information about misconduct and fraud, but transnational measures must be established to protect them and to disseminate the news of their disclosures.

In essence, international measures to restrain corruption (the transformation of public resources into private wealth) are often weak, and information about international fraud is difficult to access. Whistleblowers and journalists have thus become important instruments of accountability, but new mechanisms are needed to protect them in transnational settings.

We expect to speak to investigators who operate at an international level, especially those who work for international organizations and ethics officers at multinational corporations. We also hope to reach investigative journalists and representatives of civil society organizations.

Speakers
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Aicha El Basri

Former spokesperson for UNAMID peacekeeping troops, Government Accountability Project
avatar for A J Brown

A J Brown

Griffith University, Griffith University
Public integrity, anti-corruption, whistleblowing, integrity systems, separation of powers, horizontal accountability. For my day job I lead public integrity, anti-corruption and other research for Griffith University, Australia; and in my spare time, am a boardmember of Transparency International Australia. Check out our current research project Whistling While They Work 2: www.whistlingwhiletheywork.edu.au.
avatar for Martin Woods

Martin Woods

Head of Financial Crime, Thomson Reuters
I am the man who blew the whistle on the drug money laundering conduct of Wachovia Bank. Why did I do it? Because it was the right thing to do and the money is directly connected to the murder of tens of thousands of people. Money is the lifeblood of crime, the banks can take action to stop it or take action to profit from it . Now is the time for bankers to see the BIG picture and the consequences of their actions. Come and learn more at... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Beatrice Edwards

Beatrice Edwards

International Program Director, Former Executive Director, Government Accountability Project



Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 5

11:00

Transparent Governance in an Age of Abundance: Experiences from the Extractive Industries in Latin America and the Caribbean
Investment from the extractive industries generates more than half of government revenue in petroleum-rich countries and more than twenty percent in mining countries. This wealth of minerals and hydrocarbons has translated into substantial revenues and macroeconomic growth but operations in the extractive sector have also led to problems such as perceptions of widespread corruption, unmitigated environmental impacts, and unmet development expectations. This session will discuss transparency as a first step and a key component in the resolution of the challenges surrounding the extractive industry, with a focus on promoting ethical and sustainable investments in the extractive industries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The aim of the session is to contribute to a lively debate on transparent governance in oil, gas, and mining, share knowledge gleaned on the subject in Latin America and the Caribbean, explore work done in other regions such as Africa with a view of promoting south-south cooperation opportunities and sharing best practices. The information from the session may help policymakers, academics, investors, civil society organizations and media to learn more about how to improve the extractive sector, highlighting that the resource curse is not inevitable and that countries are finding innovative ways to enhance transparency and thus creating new spaces for vertical and horizontal accountability. The basis of this discussion is a recent book by the Inter-American Development Bank, which highlights cutting-edge research and frontier initiatives to mitigate risks inherent in the extractive industries through transparent governance.

Moderators
avatar for Francisco Paris

Francisco Paris

Regional Director for Latin America and Caribbean, Eiti

Speakers
FC

Fernando Castillo

General Director of the Social Management Office, Ministry of Energy and Mining, Peru
avatar for Daniel Kaufmann

Daniel Kaufmann

President, Nrgi
Daniel Kaufmann is currently President of the Natural Resource Governance Institute. Previously he served as a director at the World Bank Institute, where he pioneered new approaches to measure and analyze governance and corruption, helping countries formulate action programs. At the World Bank, Kaufmann also held senior positions focused on finance, regulation and anti-corruption, as well as on capacity building for Latin America. He is a... Read More →
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Anne Helen Godhavn Lunde

Leader of Ethics and Compliance, Statoil Asa
avatar for Juan Cruz Vieyra

Juan Cruz Vieyra

Operations Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank
Juan Cruz Vieyra has been with the Inter-American Development Bank since 2006, and is currently in charge of the Special Program for Institutional Development, the Institutional Capacity of the State Fund, the Canadian Fund for Universal Legal Identity, and the Transparency Trust Fund. | | Juan Cruz focuses on operations aimed at strengthening public management, transparency, and access to information. Before joining the Bank, he was a... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Juan Cruz Vieyra

Juan Cruz Vieyra

Operations Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank
Juan Cruz Vieyra has been with the Inter-American Development Bank since 2006, and is currently in charge of the Special Program for Institutional Development, the Institutional Capacity of the State Fund, the Canadian Fund for Universal Legal Identity, and the Transparency Trust Fund. | | Juan Cruz focuses on operations aimed at strengthening public management, transparency, and access to information. Before joining the Bank, he was a... Read More →



Thursday September 3, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 7

11:30

Using technology to monitor public finances & illegal logging
Not only but also featuring TIMBY (This is My Backyard), a suite of interconnected digital tools that help teams tackle complex problems with unparalleled speed and security. 

Speakers
avatar for Elena Calistru

Elena Calistru

Co-founder, Funky Citizens
avatar for Anjali Nayar

Anjali Nayar

Founder, TIMBY
Anjali is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker with over 10 years of experience reporting from the Global South. In addition to founding TIMBY, Anjali has worked for Nature, Reuters, the BBC, CBC and Al Jazeera and is the director of the documentary film Gun Runners (2016) and Logs of War (2017). Anjali has an Msc in Environmental Science from Oxford and an Msc from Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism.
avatar for Georg Neumann

Georg Neumann

Senior Communications Manager, Open Contracting Partnership
Georg Neumann is Senior Communications Manager at the Open Contracting Partnership. Georg learned his transparency ropes at Transparency International, opening the organization’s first social media profiles and blog, relaunching its website, and coordinating the global movement’s internal communication. Georg also initiated Transparency International’s social accountability initiative on technology and anticorruption. Prior to joining the... Read More →



Thursday September 3, 2015 11:30 - 13:00
Technology Hub * Hall 8

13:00

Lunch
Thursday September 3, 2015 13:00 - 14:00
Perdana Hall

14:00

Plenary II: Peace, Equality and Social Justice: Fighting Corruption in Development and Investment Beyond 2015
How to root out corruption in our quest to end extreme poverty?

Corruption only makes the rich richer and the poor poorer; it fuels conflict and violence, destroys nature and ultimately hurts those who are in most need.

Despite the benefits that foreign direct investment can bring and the progress made by many countries in a number of MDGs, grand scale corruption, natural resources depletion, illicit financial flows and tax evasion are impeding significant progress in our quest for peace, equality and social justice. But how can we ensure that anti-corruption and transparency take the central stage in foreign aid and direct investment?

The panel will discuss why transparency, accountability and integrity are at the core of human security. The session will design key recommendations for fair and transparent foreign direct investment and for the post 2015 Development Goals.

Watch the live stream here. 

Moderators
avatar for Ron Nixon

Ron Nixon

Washington correspondent for The New York Times, New York Times/ 100reporters
Ron Nixon, chairman of the board of 100Reporters, is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the consumer beat. He previously worked as an investigative reporter for the Minneapolis Star Tribune and the Roanoke Times in Virginia. Nixon was also training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors. He is the founder of The Ujima Project, an online portal of documents and data that allows... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Alley

Patrick Alley

Director, Global Witness
Patrick Alley is a Co-founder and Director of Global Witness, which focuses on preventing conflict and corruption arising from the use of natural resources. Mr. Alley focuses on tackling the trade in Conflict Resources (natural resource trade that can cause, perpetuate and fund conflict). In particular Mr. Alley works on the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia and Cote d’Ivoire, and also leads Global Witness’ campaign against industrial... Read More →
avatar for Peter Eigen

Peter Eigen

Founder, Chair Advisory Council, Founder and Chair of the Advisory Council
Prof. Dr. Peter Eigen is a lawyer by training. He has worked in economic development for 25 years, mainly as a World Bank manager of programs in Africa and Latin America; from 1988 to 1991 he was the Director of the Regional Mission for Eastern Africa of the World Bank. Under Ford Foundation sponsorship, he provided legal and technical assistance to the governments of Botswana and Namibia. In 1993 Eigen founded Transparency International (TI... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Jenkins

Kevin Jenkins

President And Chief Executive Officer, World Vision International
| | Kevin Jenkins became President and Chief Executive Officer of World Vision International in October 2009. His goal in leading the Christian relief, development and advocacy organisation is to achieve meaningful, lasting change for the world’s most vulnerable children. He previously served the organisation as a sponsor, volunteer, fund-raiser and Board member with World Vision Canada. | | Born in Western Canada, Mr Jenkins earned a... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Kaufmann

Daniel Kaufmann

President, Nrgi
Daniel Kaufmann is currently President of the Natural Resource Governance Institute. Previously he served as a director at the World Bank Institute, where he pioneered new approaches to measure and analyze governance and corruption, helping countries formulate action programs. At the World Bank, Kaufmann also held senior positions focused on finance, regulation and anti-corruption, as well as on capacity building for Latin America. He is a... Read More →
avatar for The Honourable Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri (Dr.) Haji Adenan bin Haji Satem

The Honourable Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri (Dr.) Haji Adenan bin Haji Satem

Chief Minister of Sarawak
Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri Adenan Satem was appointed Chief Minister of the Malaysian State of Sarawak on 28th February 2014. From 2010 until his appointment in 2014, he served as a Minister in The Chief Minister’s Office & Minister For Special Functions. In a long carreer of public service, Datuk Adenan Satem has also held several ministerial and parliamentary positions both in Sarawak and in the Federal Government of Malaysia... Read More →
avatar for Monique Villa

Monique Villa

CEO, Thomson Reuters Foundation
Monique Villa is CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Founder of TrustLaw and Trust Women. She has been ranked among the world’s 100 most influential people in Business Ethics by Ethisphere.Since her appointment in 2008, she has transformed the Foundation, launching a number of programmes that leverage the expertise of Thomson Reuters to trigger change and empower people across the world.Among them, TrustLaw, the Foundation's global... Read More →




Thursday September 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Plenary Hall

15:30

Coffee Break
Thursday September 3, 2015 15:30 - 16:00
Green Concourse Foyer

16:00

Corruption as a Threat to Global Security
At a time when hard security threats drive an increasing proportion of western policymaking, this session is designed to make the case that corruption isn't "just" a values issue, a matter of right and wrong, or a brake on economic development. Corruption lies at the root of most of the security crises the world is grappling with today, including extremist insurgencies in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria, Iraq’s collapse and the spread of ISIS, revolutions and their spin-offs from the Arab world to Ukraine, and the state implosion witnessed in Latin America where governments are entering into symbiotic relationships with transnational criminal superpowers. Countering corruption is no luxury. The security of the planet depends on it.

The primary aim is to make this case. Most anti-corruption activists tend to think in economic terms, in terms of human development or human security, rather than looking at the problem with a harder "international security" framing. Consequently, they don't understand why western governments and major western private-sector actors seem so stubbornly to continue enabling corruption. This session will help participants place the corruption issue within a context that is meaningful to top decision-makers in western government and business.

The session will derive an analytical framework for understanding the structure of corruption in a particular country, the types of security risks that can result, and the vulnerabilities that allow for concerted action between local civil society and Western activists seeking to influence the behaviour of their own governments and key private-sector players.

This session will be particularly focused on Western foreign and security policies that enable acutely corrupt practices, either unwittingly, or because policy trade-offs push corruption down on the list of priorities. While certain human rights concerns do gain traction in policy circles, corruption seems rarely to figure in bilateral relations with difficult countries. (The Ukraine and Iraq crises represent initial signs of change in this regard.)

International collaboration -- both among governments seeking to curb corruption, and between local civil society activists and their Western counterparts pressuring their home country governments and businesses -- is critical to changing the incentive structure within which corrupt officials are operating.

This session will be focused on a subset of states that can be considered "acutely" or "systemically" corrupt. It will examine corruption in such countries as a functioning system, in which government itself has been repurposed to serve the aim of enriching the ruling clique. Impunity for such corruption is created when the international community looks the other way, or actively facilitates it, by laundering perpetrators' assets -- and their images. Western collusion -- witting or unwitting -- is a significant element of the structure of impunity these networks build and enjoy.

Speakers
DS

Dr. Souhail Alouini

Nidaa Tounes Member of the Tunisian Parliament, Rapporteur for the Anticorruption Commission, Co-founder of OpenGov TN
avatar for Sarah Chayes

Sarah Chayes

Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Sarah Chayes is a senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program and the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment. Formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, she is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations. She is working on correlations between acute public corruption and the rise of militant extremism.A former reporter, she covered the fall of the... Read More →
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Oleksii Khmara

Executive Director, Transparency International Ukraine
EU

Elizabeth Unger

Executive Director, Transparency International Colombia
avatar for Hennie van Vuuren

Hennie van Vuuren

Senior Research Associate, Open Secrets Project - Institute for Justice & Reconcilliation
Hennie  works on issues of secrecy, access to information and corruption. He is a Senior Research Associate, at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation  in South Africa currently focussing on accountability for economic crimes during political transitions. He is a past fellow of the Open Society Foundation for South Africa and has worked as Director of the Institute for Security Studies in Cape Town and for Transparency... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Sarah Chayes

Sarah Chayes

Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Sarah Chayes is a senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program and the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment. Formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, she is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations. She is working on correlations between acute public corruption and the rise of militant extremism.A former reporter, she covered the fall of the... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Ania Ankowska

Ania Ankowska

vice-president of ACI, Eastern Europe and Russia representative, Anti-Corruption International
I am also one of the founding members of Anti-Corruption International the youth-led initiative that was born after the International Student Festival in Trondheim. I have also co-founded Youth to Youth Initiative and International Youth to Youth Summit where we focus on the most important global issues. The focus for the next year's event that is to be held in Krakow, Poland in April 2015 is the impact of corruption on our lives . Besides, I am... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 5

16:00

From graft to grab: analysing the role of corruption and impunity in large-scale land investments
Between 2000 and 2013 it is estimated that at least 49 million hectares of land in low and middle income countries has been leased to companies, or is under negotiation. Additional studies (such as the 2012 World Bank report Rising Interest in Farmland Investments ) concluded that demand for land was highest in countries with weak governance. As competition increases to control and exploit land, and the natural resources on and below it, the attractiveness of corrupting such processes for personal gain also increases. Although such problems are frequently occurring in countries which have previously experienced “resource curse” type impacts from poor governance of other natural resource assets (eg. forest, oil gas and mining sectors), governments and policy makers have been slow to respond to the challenge of corruption in the land sector.

The global rush to acquire large-scale areas of land for investment purposes evident since 2008 is increasingly linked to significant negative impacts on access to and control over natural resources, food security, human rights, and the environment. These so-called “land grabs” have been plagued by secrecy, with associated deals often made without the knowledge or consent of affected communities, who are thus unable to hold governments or investors to account. This fosters an environment where corruption and state capture becomes the norm, especially in countries where rule of law is weak, and is resulting in resource-curse type governance failures in the land sector. However, policy makers and regulatory agencies have yet to adequately understand the land grabbing – corruption nexus or respond to it; a gap which this panel attempts to address.
The aim of this session is to build an international evidence-base for how civil society, governments and the international community can tackle the conditions of corruption and impunity that exacerbate the phenomenon of land grabbing and its detrimental impact on communities and the environment.

The session will aim to produce strategies for:

  1. Fostering stronger transparency, accountability, and participation mechanisms that benefit and involve communities most affected by land grabbing, particularly those communities whose livelihoods, cultures and wellbeing are built around customary land tenure regimes;



  2. Building and strengthening international advocacy efforts to support the above that are built on a strong evidence-base; and



  3. Enabling governments, multi-lateral and bi-lateral agencies and other international institutions to identify key lessons from anti-corruption measures in the extractives and natural resource sectors, which would be relevant for addressing corruption in the land sector" "The increasing global commercial demand for land for food, fuel (eg. biofuels), fibre and financial speculative purposes, is causing devastating social and environmental impacts. Land acquisition deals are frequently concluded in secret and owners of the land are rarely even informed, let alone being given the chance to provide informed consent. The impacts are not just economic; cemeteries as well as important religious and cultural sites are also being cleared to make way for commercial investments.


Moderators
avatar for Rueben Lifuka

Rueben Lifuka

Council Member, International Anti-Corruption Conference
Rueben Lifuka is an Architect and Environmental Management Consultant working in Zambia and the Southern African region. He is also a 2011 Draper Hills Summer Fellow with the Centre for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford University, USA. He is one of the founder members of Transparency International Zambia and served as its Chapter President from 2007 to 2012. He was also elected in 2008 as a Board member on the... Read More →

Speakers
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Carlos Hernandez

Executive President, Asociación para una Sociedad Mas Justa (ASJ)
Carlos Hernández is the co-founder and president of the Association for a More Just Society (AJS). He is also president of the civil society coalition Transformemos Honduras and a member of the board of directors of the Alliance for Peace and Justice in Honduras. Hernández received his bachelor’s degree from the National Autonomous University in Honduras in 1994, and a Project Planning and Evaluation Certificate from the... Read More →
avatar for Samuel Kimeu

Samuel Kimeu

Executive Director, TI Kenya
LS

Leila Shamsaifar

Land Tenure Officer, Food And Agriculture Organization
LS

Lawrence Stephens

Chairman, TI Papua New Guinea
Originally from Australia, BA (Politics and Sociology) from Australian National University. Resident of PNG since 1976, a naturalised citizen, with roles in government, private enterprise and CSO's. Employed by the Catholic Church from 1993 to 2006, including as General Secretary to the Catholic Bishops' Conference of PNG and Solomon Islands (1999 to 2006). From 2006 to 2013 I was employed as Program Manager with PNG Sustainable Development... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Megan MacInnes

Megan MacInnes

Advisor, Global Witness
I have been working for Global Witness since 2009 and prior to that spent seven years working in Cambodia with a range of grassroots organisations on land and natural resource governance issues. I shall be coordinating a panel (with TI) which looks at the interactions between land grabbing and corruption. Global Witness is one of the few organisations globally which works on both problems, so we are really looking forward to breaking new ground... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Zoe Reiter

Zoe Reiter

Regional Programme Manager, TI-S
Transparency International


Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 3

16:00

Mobilizing societies to end impunity in contracting
Public procurement is one of the most useful tools governments have to deliver public services and fulfil the rights of citizens. When governments buy goods or services efficiently, schools are built; hospitals work, highways function and public services are successfully delivered. However, public procurement has traditionally been a closed space to society: information about public tenders is restricted, bidding terms are unclear or contracts are hidden from the public. Such opacity fosters corruption and often high levels of impunity, reducing the conditions for competitive procurement processes.

During the last decade, through different paths, civil society organizations and citizens’ groups have demanded access to information about contracts and have monitored different stages of public procurement as a way of enhancing the benefits of procurement and maximizing the use of public resources. The increased availability and reach of information technologies and the awareness of the power of open data has pushed the demand for increased openness regarding contracting even further. Some of these demands have been transformed into specific tools and mechanisms with significant impact on public procurement in different countries around the world. Moreover, some of these tools have also been developed jointly by governments and civil society organizations. Private sector has increasingly become aware of the importance of this openness and supportive of it. Still, some of these experiences are not connected between them and their impact may not be up to their potential to systematically reduce corruption and impunity.

This session addresses how the articulation of these different and diverse experiences from different actors -ranging from disclosing contracting information to engaging citizens on monitoring or private sector in promoting disclosure- can improve openness and accountability in public procurement processes. The Open Contracting initiative is already bringing together these set of experiences, along with their practitioners. The objective is not only to foster the implementation of such tools and mechanisms but also to collaboratively think about innovative approaches that improve open contracting and discourage corruption and impunity.

Moderators
avatar for Marcela Rozo

Marcela Rozo

Open Contracting Program Leader, World Bank

Speakers
ML

Monica Lopez Baltodano

Executive Director, Popolna Foundation, Nicaragua
avatar for Eduardo Bohórquez

Eduardo Bohórquez

Director, Transparencia Mexicana
Eduardo Bohórquez es Director de Transparencia Mexicana, capítulo de Transparencia Internacional en México. En 2009 diseñó el "Mecanismo de Participación Social en Guarderías" y que en 2015 obtuvo uno de los reconocimientos del Premio de Gobierno Abierto. Recientemente coordinó el libro "Opening Parliaments", sobre la apertura de los Congresos en el mundo. Es miembro del Consejo Asesor de Datos Abiertos del Gobierno de México y de la... Read More →
AG

Angelita Gregorio-Medel

Under-secretary for Institutional Development, Government of the Philippines
avatar for Mathias Huter

Mathias Huter

Executive Director, Forum Informationsfreiheit
With Forum Informationsfreiheit, I advocate for the Right to Information and more transparency in Austrian politics and administration. We are currently working to launch Parteispenden.at, a website keeping track of the finances of Austrian parties. | I also work as a consultant on open data, anti-corruption and transparency issues. From 2009 to 2014, I worked in leadership positions with Transparency International Georgia, where I focused... Read More →
avatar for Nisha Thompson

Nisha Thompson

Director, Data{Meet}, Datameet
Nisha Thompson has a background in online community organizing. She has worked for the Sunlight Foundation in Washington DC, with online communities to use US government data to hold elected officials accountable. She moved to Bangalore in October 2010 where contributed to a research report on Open Government Data in India for the Centre for Internet and Society. Then was manager of the Data Project for Arghyam, a Trust... Read More →
TY

Tricia Yeoh

Chief Operating Officer, Institute For Democracy And Economic Affairs (Idea

Rapporteur
avatar for Georg Neumann

Georg Neumann

Senior Communications Manager, Open Contracting Partnership
Georg Neumann is Senior Communications Manager at the Open Contracting Partnership. Georg learned his transparency ropes at Transparency International, opening the organization’s first social media profiles and blog, relaunching its website, and coordinating the global movement’s internal communication. Georg also initiated Transparency International’s social accountability initiative on technology and anticorruption. Prior to joining the... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 7

16:00

Pushing for more and better | G20 Action on Beneficial Ownership & Public Procurement Transparency, Open Data and More
This session will provide an area for discussion and reflection around the implementation of last year’s civil society advocacy wins under a Turkish presidency and a look ahead to what could be achieved when China hosts next year.

In 2014 Transparency International and partners played an instrumental role in the adoption of a G20 Anti-Corruption Action Plan 2015-2016. It committed the G20 to focus on integrity in public procurement, as well as open data. To learn and reflect upon these efforts, an update will be provided on both issues by Maggie Murphy who coordinates TI’s advocacy work at the G20.

TI and partners have also successfully advocated for a formal mechanism through which civil society can engage with the G20; the “Civil 20” or C20. Current steering committee member, Oya Ozarslan will provide an update of civil society’s efforts to influence the G20 this year and provide some tips for future civil society hosts.

A second major win of 2014 under the Australian presidency was the adoption of the G20 Beneficial Ownership Transparency Principles. This year an assessment of how well each G20 country is implementing those Principles to highlight areas of improvement is being conducted. Maira Martini who has led a G20 research project will share  some preliminary findings for discussion. The group will have the opportunity to chat over the findings and discuss the next steps with a view to ensure greater implementation across all G20 countries.

Finally a discussion concerning G20 advocacy in 2016 and beyond will take place, casting an eye towards China’s presidency next year. Participants interested in advocacy, partnership building and G20 outcomes are encouraged  to attend and join the discussion.

Moderators
avatar for Maggie Murphy

Maggie Murphy

Senior Coordinator, Global Advocacy And Policy, Transparency International
I am Senior Coordinator in the Global Advocacy and Policy team of Transparency International. I lead Transparency International's work at the G20, working with colleagues in Chapters in 19 of the G20 members, with a particular focus on financial transparency issues. Most recently, prior to working at Transparency International I worked as a UN advocate for Minority Rights Group International and in the international advocacy team of Amnesty... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Huguette Labelle

Huguette Labelle

Former Chair, Expert Advisor Policy & Development, Individual Member
Huguette Labelle is the former Chair of the Board of Transparency International, member of the Board of the UN Global Compact, member of the Group of External Advisors on the World Bank Governance and Anti-corruption Strategy, member of the Advisory Group to the Asian Development Bank on Climate Change and Sustainable Development, member of the Executive Board of the Africa Capacity Building Foundation, member of the Board of the Global Centre... Read More →
avatar for Maira Martini

Maira Martini

Knowledge and Policy Coordinator, Transparency International
avatar for Emine Oya Özarslan

Emine Oya Özarslan

Chair, TI Turkey

Rapporteur
avatar for Casey Kelso

Casey Kelso

Advocacy Director, TI-S
Let's talk about accountability for the grand corrupt... And the illicit financial flows that are sent ping-ponging around the world to buy mansions, jets and yachts. Who would you nominate as the worst of a bad bunch?


Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 4

16:00

The Future of The Fight: Driving Youth Action and Social Movements to Beat Corruption
The youth play a pivotal role in the fight against corruption. Not only does a significant part of the global population comprise of the youth, but they also tend to be involved in many different aspects of society, such as school and the workforce. This can result in a higher rate of susceptibility or exposure to bribery and corruption.

Simultaneously, history has shown that some of the world’s largest and most impactful social movements have been initiated by dynamic youth taking a stand against social grievances stemming from corruption matters. Youth participation in social movements can provide important and innovative insights, such as the appropriation of “new media” tools. These have played a significant role in effective and swift collective mobilisation by the youth, especially in more recent times, such as the Arab Spring. Many young people have the desire and capacity to transform the world and often develop powerful concepts and use sophisticated aesthetic forms to call out or identify systemic corruption.

This session will provide an open platform for the youth to share and shed light on their experiences, and how, based on their challenges and successes, youth action against corruption can transpire and expand across contexts. The panel speakers will discuss the following:

Understanding youth mobilisation, activism and social movements in different contexts; learning from the examples of Tunisia and Malaysia;


  1. Effective methods in demanding accountability from policy makers;

  2. Ensuring the sustainability of youth action and social movements;

  3. National, Regional and International solutions toward youth empowerment, social movements and creating a more conscious youth demographic in the fight against corruption.


Moderators
avatar for Emmanuel Sanyi

Emmanuel Sanyi

Founder and National President, The Duke Of Edinburgh's International Award Camero

Speakers
avatar for Nurul Izzah Anwar

Nurul Izzah Anwar

MP of Lembah Pantai / Vice President, The Parliament Of Malaysia
avatar for Soumaya Belaid

Soumaya Belaid

Programs Manager (Anti-corruption | Transparency | People Engagement), I Watch Organization
Soumaya is a Tunisian youth activist who comes from an English Literature educational background. Having a great passion to poetry, but a greater interest to the issues of corruption and lack of transparency, she devoted her career to fighting corruption and engaging people in the process. For 4 years, the young girl has been working with civil society organizations. In fact, Soumaya is one of the originals in I WATCH organization. She has been... Read More →
JJ

Jufitri Joha

Vice- President, Malaysian Islamic Youth Movement
Jufitri Joha is currently a Vice President of Malaysian Youth Council (MBM) and Vice President Muslim Youth Movement of Malaysia (ABIM) in charging youth and intellectual development. He obtained LLB from International Islamic University of Malaysia (IIUM) and Master of Arts in Community and Youth Work from Durham University, United Kingdom. Currently he is pursuing his PhD in Youth Studies at Institute for Social Science Studies (IPSAS) of... Read More →
avatar for Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman

Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman

Part Time Lecturer, Independent
Syed Saddiq is a debate enthusiast and youth activist who is currently employed as the youngest part-time lecturer in IIUM. He’s a world record holder for being the highest scored Debater (ESL) in the history of the World Universities Debate Championship. He is the record holder of Asia & Malaysia after being ranked TOP 10 at the World Universities Debate Championship and breaking for three consecutive years outwitting more than 800... Read More →

Session Coordinators
TC

Tze Chin Chak

Project Manager, Transparency International Malaysia

Rapporteur
avatar for Narayan Adhikari

Narayan Adhikari

South Asia Representative, Accountability Lab
Narayan Adhikari is an Accountability Entrepreneurs. He is the Lab’s South Asia Representative. He is one of the founding members and also serves as the South Asia Representative for the Global Youth Anti-Corruption Network(GYAC). He has completed Atlas Corps Think Tank (LINKS) Fellow at United States. Narayan has also participated in the U.S. International Visitors Leadership Program (IVLP) and is a State Alumni. He has ompleted a Recently he... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 9

16:00

Turning a Blind Eye: Combating Corruption Facilitating Wildlife Trafficking
Today’s reality is that criminal and illicit networks have expanded their tentacles to all parts of the world, corrupting public and market-based institutions alike. Their activities threaten not only the interdependent commercial, transportation, and transactional systems that facilitate free trade and the movement of people throughout the global economy, but jeopardize governance structures, economic development, security, and supply chain integrity. Wildlife trafficking is a multi-billion dollar criminal activity that has evolved into a security threat. The high tech weaponry and aggressive tactics used by poachers and the syndicates and corrupt officials that support them threaten civilian security. Wildlife trafficking is a lucrative form of transnational organized crime (TOC) and conservative estimates place this top-ranked illicit trade at billions of dollars annually. Illicit trafficking in wildlife fuels corruption, threatens the rule of law, and destabilizes communities that depend on wildlife for biodiversity and eco-tourism revenues. It is fueled by high demand for wildlife products, high profits, and low risk for detection or meaningful punishment

This will be the first ever high level session held within the International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) to focus on wildlife trafficking. The high level panelists for this session bring decades of expertise on international anti-corruption and law enforcement work. This panel will discuss ways corruption fuels wildlife trafficking, particularly in the supply chain and transport sectors, and how governments and international partners can combat corruption related to wildlife trafficking, including through strengthened laws, capacity building through training, and ensuring arrests lead to prosecutions. The panelists will discuss what is being done and what more the global community can do to improve its efforts to combat the corruption involved in wildlife trafficking. To safeguard these iconic yet critically threatened species, we must make anti-corruption a central focus of attack all along the global supply chain, and target converging threats more holistically, and comprehensively.

Speakers
JC

James Compton

Senior Director for Asia Pacific, TRAFFIC
avatar for David M. Luna

David M. Luna

Senior Director for National Security and Diplomacy, Office of Anti-Crime Programs, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, U.S. Department of State
David M. Luna helps coordinate diplomatic initiatives on national security and threat convergence including international organized crime, corruption, money laundering, terrorist financing, IPR enforcement, consumer counterfeits, cybersecurity/cybercrime, environmental crime (wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, illicit fisheries; climate change and national security),  and smuggling/trafficking crimes that impact the US homeland, and... Read More →
avatar for John Sellar

John Sellar

Independent Anti-Smuggling, Fraud, and Organized Crime Consultant
John M. Sellar OBE FRGS was engaged in law enforcement for almost four decades, initially in the Scottish Police Service and then the United Nations.  As a Detective, he investigated murders and other serious crime but also dealt with human rights abuse in Scotland’s maximum security prison. Before transferring to the UN, he was Officer-in-Charge of a police area where royal security and anti-terrorism matters featured... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Louise Shelley

Dr. Louise Shelley

Director, Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, Traccc, George Mason University
Illicit trade, human trafficking, transnational crime, corruption and terrorism, illicit wildlife trade | author of Dirty Entanglements:Corruption, Crime and Terrorism.

Session Coordinators
JG

Jessica Graham

Jessica Graham has been working at the U.S. Department of State for the last six years. Currently, she serves as a Senior Advisor for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL). In this position, she has developed an environmental crime program for the Bureau and the Department of State, specializing in wildlife trafficking and illegal logging topics. She has worked closely on the President’s National Strategy... Read More →



Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Hall 6

16:00

A screening of "Citizen Four"

In January 2013, filmmaker Laura Poitras was several years into the making of a film about abuses of national security in post­-9/11 America when she started receiving encrypted e­mails from someone identifying himself as “citizen four,” who was ready to blow the whistle on the massive covert surveillance programs run by the NSA and other intelligence agencies. In June 2013, she and reporter Glenn Greenwald flew to Hong Kong for the first of many meetings with the man who turned out to be Edward Snowden. She brought her camera with her. The film that resulted from this series of tense encounters is absolutely unique in the history of cinema: a 100% real ­life thriller unfolding minute by minute before our eyes.

Director: Laura Poitras
Producer: Dirk Wilutzky, Mathilde Bonnefoy, Laura Poitras
Year: 2014
Language: English
Duration: 114min



Thursday September 3, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
IACC Cinema

16:30

Money and Politics: how to use technology to monitor political party financing?
Money & politics are indispensable to each other. To properly monitor politics it is important to see where the money behind it comes from and goes to. Can technology help in this regard? Certainly. Listen to success stories and insights from Georgia, Austria, Czech Republic, Ukraine and elsewhere. 

Speakers
avatar for Mathias Huter

Mathias Huter

Executive Director, Forum Informationsfreiheit
With Forum Informationsfreiheit, I advocate for the Right to Information and more transparency in Austrian politics and administration. We are currently working to launch Parteispenden.at, a website keeping track of the finances of Austrian parties. | I also work as a consultant on open data, anti-corruption and transparency issues. From 2009 to 2014, I worked in leadership positions with Transparency International Georgia, where I focused... Read More →
avatar for Jiri Skuhrovec

Jiri Skuhrovec

Head, Econlab
Czech economist, programmer. Leads projects monitoring political party financing (politickefinance.cz) or public procurement (zindex.cz). Founder of Econlab - Czech NGO focusing on data-driven policy analyses, advisor for open data on Czech Ministry of Finance, active researcher at Charles University.



Thursday September 3, 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Technology Hub * Hall 8

18:00

Plenary III: Keeping Business Clean and Stopping Illicit Financial Flows
How can companies and their leaders contribute to the fight against corruption?

Increasingly, international organisations and governments are recognising the real cost of dirty money in the financial system: illicit financial outflows from poor countries dwarf aid and investment, ever-powerful criminal networks launder money through offshore havens, shell companies and secrecy jurisdictions facilitate massive tax evasion to the detriment of cash-strapped national budgets, to name a few. Each a driving force behind the global financial crisis.

This session will engage a multi-sector expert panel to critically reflect upon the current state of affairs in the world of money. Acknowledging the steps that banks, businesses, civil society and governments are taking to stem illicit flows, it will highlight what needs to be done to ensure that dirty money is rooted out from the global financial system.

Watch the live stream here. 

Moderators
avatar for Michael Peel

Michael Peel

Michael Peel is a British journalist. He has written for various publications including Granta, New Republic, New Statesman and London Review of Books. He is currently the Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times and author of A Swamp Full of Dollars: Pipelines and Paramilitaries at Nigeria’s Oil Frontier. Over 15 years at the FT, I’ve reported on both important countries and big themes, such as oil and international... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anna Bossman

Anna Bossman

Director of Integrity and Anti-Corruption, AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
Ms. Anna Bossman is the Director of Integrity and Anti-Corruption (IACD) at the African Development Bank Group (AfDB). IACD carries out investigations into allegations of fraud and corruption and other malpractices in operations financed by the AfDB. The office also develops preventive measures to proactively reduce the potential for misconduct, fraud or corruption in AfDB financed operations. In March and May 2014, as a result of IACD’s... Read More →
avatar for Robert Card

Robert Card

President & CEO, Snc Lavalin
Robert (Bob) Card is the President & CEO of SNC-Lavalin, one of the world's largest engineering, construction, operations and asset investment firms with 40,000 employees and nearly $10 billion in revenue. He also serves as a member of the Board of Directors. The firm operates in nearly 100 countries through its major business units including Mining & Metallurgy, Power, Hydrocarbons & Chemicals, Infrastructure & Construction... Read More →
avatar for Pascal Lamy

Pascal Lamy

President Emeritus, Jacques Delors Institute
From September 2005 to August 2013, Pascal Lamy served for two consecutive terms as General Director- of the World Trade Organization (WTO). A committed European and member of the French Socialist party, he was Chief of Staff for the President of the European Commission, Jacques Delors from 1985 to 1994. He then joined the Credit Lyonnais as CEO until 1999, before returning to Brussels as European Trade Commissioner until 2004. Mr. Lamy holds... Read More →
AL

An Ling

Senior Director General of the Ministry of Supervision, People's Republic of China
Since 2013, Ms. An Ling is a Senior Director General of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI), Ministry of Supervision, China In 2006, she was appointed as Deputy Director General of the General Office of CCDI; In 2005, she was appointed as Deputy Director General of the Case Management Department of CCDI; In 1994, she came to work in the General Office of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) as a Division... Read More →
avatar for Honourable Datuk Nor Shamsiah Mohd Yunus

Honourable Datuk Nor Shamsiah Mohd Yunus

Deputy Governor, Central Bank of Malaysia
Datuk Nor Shamsiah Yunus is currently the Deputy Governor in Bank Negara Malaysia. She is responsible for the prudential and anti-money laundering (AML) supervision of commercial banks (conventional and Islamic banks), investment banks, insurance companies (conventional and Takaful) and development financial institutions. She also oversees the financial intelligence and enforcement functions, Strategic Human Capital Management and the corporate... Read More →




Thursday September 3, 2015 18:00 - 19:30
Plenary Hall

19:30

Gala Dinner
During the Gala Dinner the winners of the Thomson Reuters Foundation, Transparency International and IACC 'Capturing Corruption' Photo Competition will be presented.


Speakers
avatar for Virginie Coulloudon

Virginie Coulloudon

Group Director, External Relations, TI-S
avatar for Monique Villa

Monique Villa

CEO, Thomson Reuters Foundation
Monique Villa is CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Founder of TrustLaw and Trust Women. She has been ranked among the world’s 100 most influential people in Business Ethics by Ethisphere.Since her appointment in 2008, she has transformed the Foundation, launching a number of programmes that leverage the expertise of Thomson Reuters to trigger change and empower people across the world.Among them, TrustLaw, the Foundation's global... Read More →


Thursday September 3, 2015 19:30 - 22:00
Perdana Hall
 
Friday, September 4
 

08:30

Bringing business and government together to fight corruption: The Business Ombudsman institution
The aims/objectives of the panel “Bringing Business and Government Together to Fight Corruption: The Business Ombudsman Institution” are to explore the role of the business ombudsman institution and other similar mechanisms in tackling corruption and levelling the playing field for business.

The session will bring together established experts in the field to discuss their experiences of business ombudsmen institutions  and the High-Level Reporting Mechanism (HLRM), the successes and failures as well as their thoughts on how these institutions can best be designed and strengthened to help reform-minded governments to clean up the investment climate in their countries. Discussions will focus on the underlying reasons for the required structural changes. In order to make any reform recommendations, the first step is to have a clear and evidence-based picture of the structures and processes that enable people to act with impunity. Impunity can only exist where a justice system has become dysfunctional; hence it is important to identify those risks that undermine the delivery of justice. Also, the panellists will demonstrate the benefit of mobilizing other stakeholders in the identification of risks and subsequent monitoring of reforms. They will build on real experience in the field to show how such institutions could facilitate improvements in the investment climate, including a greater degree of accountability of the government.

Moderators
avatar for Juraj Strasser

Juraj Strasser

Senior Counsellor, Ebrd
Juraj has over 25 years of legal, policy and compliance experience. He started his career with the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton, followed by almost seventeen years in the legal department at the EBRD, between 1993 and 2010, most recently as Chief Counsel responsible for legal work in Russia. After leaving the EBRD, he worked for several years as General Counsel for a large private power developer, where he was also responsible... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Gemma Aiolfi

Gemma Aiolfi

Head of Compliance, Corporate Governance and Collective Action, Basel Institute on Governance
We host the B20 Collective Action Hub, it's the place to find more about what's going on in anti corruption Collective Action, learn how to start a Collective Action, how to get more information and support from the Basel Institute and the International Centre for Collective Action. We're also interested in acting as facilitator to initiatives, link up like minded stakeholders and get the ball rolling! Do get in touch, we're here to help.
AB

Alice Beggrun Comas

Chief Officer for International Affairs, Secretary for Transparency of the Presidency of the Republic of Colombia
avatar for Algirdas Šemeta

Algirdas Šemeta

Business Ombudsman for Ukraine, Business Ombudsman Council Ukraine



Friday September 4, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 3

08:30

Collective Action against Corruption
Whether through large-scale social mobilizations, as exemplified most vividly in the Arab Spring, or through numerous cases of bottom-up incremental change achieved through the concerted actions of citizens and their communities, the potential of civil society to challenge corrupt regimes has been confirmed repeatedly over the past decade.

However, we believe that one of the biggest challenges facing the future is how to harness the energy and potential of collective action by citizens and translate it into institutionalized participatory mechanisms to hold governments accountable and end impunity.

Therefore, this session will address the question of how to formulate, develop and implement context sensitive and sustainable mechanisms to enable people to undertake collective action against corruption.

The aim of this panel is to bring together practitioners with experience in the use of social accountability mechanisms as anti-corruption tools for an in depth discussion aimed at sharing what works in engaging and enabling the participation of civil society against corruption in a sustainable manner.

Our hope to produce the following:
a) An understanding of context sensitivity. What are the key elements from the local context that should be taken into account when tailoring social accountability mechanisms? (e.g. individualism/collectivism, perceptions of likelihood of retribution for denouncing corruption).
b) An understanding of what specific social accountability mechanisms work better for which contexts.

The panel comprised of representatives from UNDP, Transparency International, Integrity Action and Basel Institute on Governance will share on experiences and lessons learned in the development and application of methodologies to develop and adjust social accountability mechanisms to local contexts with the goal of maximizing citizen uptake and sustainability of the intervention.

The premise is that the best way to empower citizens is by developing institutional mechanisms to counter corruption that take into account:
a) The local norms and values that permeate social relations, and
b) How citizens view their interactions with the state and state officials and therefore how they understand and experience corruption.

This information may then be used to develop social accountability mechanisms that involve socially acceptable participation modes, that make sense and are easily accessible to users, and that are therefore also sustainable in the long run. Case study examples that will be discussed include the Philippines, Serbia, Ghana, Mexico and Tanzania, etc.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Hart

Elizabeth Hart

Consultant & Instructor, Independent and University of Washington
I work on a range of anti-corruption and development issues, from donor integrity policies to social accountability. At the moment I'm particularly interested in learning about groups and individuals who are doing innovative work in developing country settings to strengthen the accountability of governments to citizens. What's working out there? I'd love to hear about it!

Speakers
JA

Jennifer Asuako

Programme Analyst, United Nations Development Programme
IC

Irina Codrean

Co-founder, LaEtaj.md
JS

Joy Saunders

Chief Executive Officer, Integrity Action

Session Coordinators
avatar for Aida Arutyunova

Aida Arutyunova

Anti-Corruption Specialist, United Nations Development Programme



Friday September 4, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 9

08:30

People’s engagement in service delivery: empowering citizens and civil society through ICTs
How can Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and open data foster people’s engagement and empower citizens to reduce corruption and improve service delivery? The panel will discuss the role of ICTs and open data in enabling and empowering citizens and civil society to hold public officials to account and whether they can potentially serve as instruments for citizens to socially sanction corruption. While they offer tremendous potential to advance the anti-corruption agenda, involving people and reducing the opportunities for corruption, harnessing this potential requires critical conditions in terms of design, implementation, and use. The panel will explore under which circumstances the use of open data and digital technology can be integrated into and leveraged by other interventions to engage people in driving for real change in the delivery of services.

We aim to understand innovative and effective experiences of open data and ICT-enabled approaches to engage and empower people in order to prevent and reduce corruption, identifying solutions and promising practices while also underscoring the main use and implementation challenges. The panel will also address some of the emerging issues and open questions regarding ICTs and open data. Specifically, the session will discuss:


  1. Successful open data and ICT-enabled initiatives for improving service delivery, holding public officials to account, and tackling corruption, including oversight, monitoring and prevention.

  2. Using ICTs and open data for monitoring and social sanctioning in contexts where service delivery is plagued by corruption and impunity.

  3. The critical success factors that are needed for realizing the full potential of ICTs and open data.

  4. The role of different actors regarding ICTs and open data for anti-corruption and how they can promote or enable collaboration between citizens and governments to tackle corruption collectively.

  5. New approaches using ICTs and open data, and what could be their potential impact for anti-corruption.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Canares

Michael Canares

Regional Research Manager - Asia, Open Data Lab Jakarta - World Wide Web Foundation
Michael "Miko" Cañares is Open Data Lab Jakarta’s Regional Research Manager for Asia. He has more than ten years of research and development work experience at a progressive pace – from community-based project management to regional development with most of his work rooted mainly in Southeast Asia. He delves in different programmatic themes, such as health, child-focused development, natural resource management, financial... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Davies

Rachel Davies

Senior Advocacy Manager, Transparency International Uk
Rachel is the Senior Advocacy Manager at Transparency International UK and heads TI-UK's communications work, as well the UK-focused advocacy on money laundering, political corruption, and open governance. She is Chair of the Bond Anti-Corruption Group, a collection of like-minded British NGOs who work on the issue of corruption, and sits on the steering group for the UK Open Governance Partnership Civil Society Network
avatar for Anna Levy

Anna Levy

Governance Project Director, SimLab
Anna is the Governance Project Director at Social Impact Lab, a DC- and Nairobi-based non-profit focused on inclusive technologies in various social sectors. The governance project operates at the intersection of low-end technologies and civic dialogue, civil society advocacy, city service delivery, transparency and accountability in international organizations and public agencies, and data ethics. Anna joins the 2015 EWB conference as a... Read More →
avatar for Lorenzo Segato

Lorenzo Segato

Executive Director - TACOD coordinator, Rissc
PhD in Criminology, co-founder of RiSSC, Research Centre on Security and Crime. | Lorenzo is the scientific coordinator of the TACOD project - Tackling Corruption through Open Data, funded by the European Commission, whose results are presented at the 16IACC. | In the past years, Lorenzo Segato has coordinated several research project and carried out qualitative studies on Corruption in Italy on public procurement, renewable energies... Read More →
avatar for Gladys Selosa

Gladys Selosa

Program manager, ANSA-EAP
Gladys Honey Selosa is a social accountability practitioner since 2004. She specializes in the design, development and implementation of tools under the thematic areas of infrastructure and education. Gladys' range of experience and interest covers public financial management, including participatory budgeting, procurement monitoring, contract monitoring, social audits and participatory audits. She is also a resource person for... Read More →
NS

Nicolas Seris

Humanitarian Aid Integrity Network Coordinator, Transparency International - Kenya
Nicolas Séris has fifteen years of experience managing development and humanitarian aid programmes in Africa and the Middle East. He is working with Transparency International (TI) since 2008 and is currently coordinating TI Global Humanitarian aid integrity programme and co-chairs the Quality and Accountability Inter-Agency Working Group (IAWG) for East and Central Africa since 2013. Nicolas previously worked as a senior programme... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Aranzazu	Guillan Montero

Aranzazu Guillan Montero

Senior Program Advisor, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre
U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre
NT

Nils Taxell

U4 Senior Advisor, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre

Rapporteur
avatar for Maira Martini

Maira Martini

Knowledge and Policy Coordinator, Transparency International


Friday September 4, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 6

08:30

Tackling grand corruption: what recommendations to the UNCAC Conference of States Parties in November?
Grand corruption involves huge amounts of money and power and has a direct and serious impact on human rights. When, for example, members of a dominant elite are able to use their influence over the state apparatus to plunder public resources and extort money from the population, while also capturing or blocking domestic oversight and enforcement agencies--the result is huge injustice and a setback to development. It means people suffer loss of livelihood and life opportunities and are deprived of access to resources and basic services – it means their lives are diminished or destroyed. How can grand corruption be countered, when kleptocrats and their henchmen wield such extensive control?

The UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) is the main international framework for fighting corruption and includes a range of anti-corruption measures to prevent and sanction grand corruption, including criminalization measures like illicit enrichment, trading in influence, abuse of functions, international cooperation and asset recovery. The Conference of States Parties (COSP) - the main meeting where governments discuss results of their anti-corruption work and mark out priorities for the future, has adopted recommendations (http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/CAC-COSP-session5-resolutions.html) stating that international co-operation in anti-corruption investigations is as important as are involving the civil society and the private sector.

The next UNCAC COSP gathering of governments and observers will take place in St. Petersburg in November this year. The UNCAC review process’ first five-year cycle reviewing country implementation of criminalization, enforcement and international cooperation measures is also now coming to an end. Does the UNCAC framework offer the means for addressing the crime of grand corruption? Does the biennial UNCAC forum offer a promising arena for discussing ideas and approaches to dealing with this form of massive criminal activity? What recommendations should the IACC make to the UNCAC meeting?

In the workshop session we will discuss these questions -- how to tackle grand corruption and what potential role for UNCAC--and look for possible common approaches and recommendations.

The workshop will start by considering particular cases of grand corruption. We will review the situation in Malaysia, identifying the loopholes that make grand corruption possible; the obstacles to enforcement against it; and the steps needed to improve deterrence and punishment.

Building on this country experience, the second part of the session will review different typologies of grand corruption and methods of money laundering, including via secret companies and real estate.

The session will then move on to consider the mechanisms available to address grand corruption. We will discuss what can be done by civil society, governments and inter-governmental institutions in order to more decisively address grand corruption. We will also consider the approaches to fighting it in various environments, both more and less prone to corruption, both more and less willing to provide space for civil society. We will also consider the strengths and weaknesses of UNCAC as a tool for addressing grand corruption.

During the final part of the session participants will discuss priority approaches to strengthening prevention and enforcement against grand corruption and possible recommendations to the UNCAC COSP meeting in November or discussions to be conducted there, as well as in other forums.

Moderators
AP

Anton Pominov

TI Russia
Transparency International – Russia

Speakers
FC

Francesco Checchi

Anti Corruption Adviser | UNODC Regional Office | for Southeast Asia and the Pacific | Bangkok, Thailand
avatar for Ravindran Devagunam

Ravindran Devagunam

Performance Management and Delivery Unit (PEMANDU), Pemandu
CG

Cynthia Gabriel

Founding Director, Centre To Combat Corruption & Cronyism
avatar for Manzoor Hasan

Manzoor Hasan

Chair, UNCAC Coalition
Manzoor Hasan is currently serving as the Executive Director of South Asian Institute of Advanced Legal and Human Rights Studies (SAILS), and the Chair of UN Convention against Corruption Coalition (UNCAC) since June, 2014. Mr. Hasan is also a member of the Advisory Council of BRAC Institute of Governance and Development, BRAC University. Previously he worked as the Deputy Executive Director of BRAC, the largest NGO in the world. He was also... Read More →
avatar for Akaash Maharaj

Akaash Maharaj

Chief Executive Officer, Global Org Of Parliamentarians Against Corruption
One of our key priorities is international prosecution of Grand Corruption: http://gop.ac/19ALtTW | The Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC), is an international institution of legislators, working together to combat corruption, strengthen democracy, and uphold the rule of law. GOPAC has full national chapters in 56 parliaments, and individual parliamentary members in nearly every country of the world.
avatar for Loi Kheng Min

Loi Kheng Min

Deputy President, Transparency International Malaysia
avatar for Ji Won Park

Ji Won Park

Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (Star)
Ji Won Park is an attorney with two decades of experience in government, private sector, and civil society organizations in the United States and South Korea. At the Financial Market Integrity Unit of the World Bank and the Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) since 2009, her projects include The Puppet Masters: How the Corrupt Hide Stolen Assets Using Legal Structures and What to Do about It, Left Out of the Bargain: Settlements in Foreign... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Gillian Dell

Gillian Dell

Head of Conventions Unit, UNCAC Coalition

Rapporteur
avatar for Adam Földes

Adam Földes

advocacy advisor, Transparency International
Adam joined Transparency International in September 2012 after working for more than three years with Transparency International Hungary. Prior, he conducted researches, advocacy and policy development to promote and defend the right of access to information, specialised in issues relating to the protection of personal data and state secrecy. He also worked for Access Info Europe (Madrid, Spain) and led the Freedom of Information and Personal... Read More →


Friday September 4, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 4

08:30

The Next Level of International Efforts Against Global Corruption
This session will take a look at the collective and individual efforts of the MDBs to proactively tackle the corruption risks in development projects since cross- debarment was introduced in 2010.  It will critically examine what has worked, and what hasn’t and provide insights to identify drivers what will shape the MDB’s approaches to tackle corruption risks going forward.

Moderators
avatar for Clare Wee

Clare Wee

Head, Office of Anticorruption and Integrity, Asian Development Bank
Ms. Clare Wee is Head of OAI, which is the focal point in ADB’s drive against corruption and for dealing with alleged incidents of corruption or fraud in its projects or by its staff. Ms. Wee joined OAI as Director after serving as Assistant General Counsel of ADB’s Office of the General Counsel from 2005-2007. | | Prior to working in ADB, Ms. Wee practiced law in New York City, USA with the law firm Whitman, Breed, Abott & Morgan. Her... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Maristella Aldana

Maristella Aldana

Chief, Office of Institutional Integrity, Inter-American Development Bank
Maristella Aldana is the Chief of the Office of Institutional Integrity (OII) of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), an independent office responsible for ensuring IDB Group financed activities adhere to the highest ethical standards. In this capacity, Ms. Aldana leads a multidisciplinary group that investigates allegations of fraud and corruption in activities financed by the IDB Group and seeks the imposition of administrative... Read More →
avatar for Anna Bossman

Anna Bossman

Director of Integrity and Anti-Corruption, AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
Ms. Anna Bossman is the Director of Integrity and Anti-Corruption (IACD) at the African Development Bank Group (AfDB). IACD carries out investigations into allegations of fraud and corruption and other malpractices in operations financed by the AfDB. The office also develops preventive measures to proactively reduce the potential for misconduct, fraud or corruption in AfDB financed operations. In March and May 2014, as a result of IACD’s... Read More →
avatar for David Hawkes

David Hawkes

Head Of Special Litigation, World Bank Integriy Vice Presidency
David Hawkes currently heads the Special Litigation Unit in the World Bank Group’s Integrity Vice Presidency (INT). The Special Litigation Unit represents INT’s investigative findings in World Bank Group sanctions proceedings. Before joining the World Bank in 2005, Mr. Hawkes served as a prosecutor and later as a deputy head in the anti-corruption department of the Staatsanwaltschaft Berlin (Berlin Office of the Prosecutor) and as... Read More →
avatar for Bernard O'Donnell

Bernard O'Donnell

Head Of Division, Fraud Investigations, European Investment Bank
Bernard (Bernie) O'Donnell joined the Inspectorate General of the European Investment Bank in March 2015, as Head of Division for Fraud Investigations (IG/IN). | | The Fraud Investigations Division is responsible for investigation activities relating to allegations of fraud, corruption and other prohibited conduct both internal and external to the Bank. This work is done in close cooperation with the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF... Read More →
LR

Lisa Rosen

Cheif Compliance Officer, European Bank For Reconstruction And Development



Friday September 4, 2015 08:30 - 10:30
Hall 7

09:00

How to use technology to monitor political corruption?
This session looks at how online tools can help in the fight against corruption: lobbying, revolving doors, conflicts of interest… EU Integrity Watch allows users to monitor their elected officials for outside activities and potential conflicts of interest. It also provides a powerful overview of Lobbying in Brussels.
The European Corruption Observatory is a comprehensive database tracking media stories from across the 28 EU member states.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Coleman

Alison Coleman

Project Coordinator, Transparency International EU Liaison Office
Alison is the Project Coordinator for the European Corruption Observatory, an online database of media reports on corruption and a meeting point for journalists, hackers, experts and all those interested in corruption.
avatar for Daniel Freund

Daniel Freund

Head of Advocacy EU Integrity, Transparency International EU
Daniel Freund leads Transparency International's work on the integrity of the EU institutions. He is responsible for EU Integrity Watch (www.integritywatch.eu), as well as the work on legislative transparency, conflicts of interest, lobbying, revolving doors and the legislative footprint. He is based in Brussels. | Before joining TI, Daniel was a political adviser in the European Parliament working on constitutional and legal issues. He has... Read More →



Friday September 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Technology Hub * Hall 8

10:30

Coffee Break
Friday September 4, 2015 10:30 - 11:00
Green Concourse Foyer

11:00

A screening of "Dirty Money: How corrupt PNG cash is reaching Australia"

This special Dateline investigation revealed senior lawyers detailing how to avoid detection when laundering money into Australia and beyond.

SBS Dateline revealed undercover footage showing lawyers from a leading law firm in Papua New Guinea revealing a trail of corruption and influence peddling involving politicians, bureaucrats and lawyers.

The film’s had significant impact in PNG and Australia.  

Since airing, the PNG Prime Minister has called for an investigation into money laundering between the countries. The PNG Opposition leader Don Poyle has asked for a royal commission into international money laundering and sought co-operation from Australia, the US, the United Kingdom, Japan, Korea and New Zealand.   Senior Australian Government Ministers including Joe Hockey and Julie Bishop, have spoken out condemning money laundering, promising to investigate. 

This story was important because of the deep ties between Australia and PNG. Australia provides around half a billion in aid to our Pacific neighbour and yet rumours of corruption at the highest level in the country persist.   SBS Dateline was also told the Federal Government and AFP are intentionally turning a blind eye to this illegal behaviour so as not to jeopardise the nations’ agreement to take asylum seekers on Manus island.

Reporter: Meggie Palmer
Producer: Meggie Palmer & Geoff Parish
Organisations involved: NGO Global Witness, SBS Dateline and Fairfax Media
Year: 2015
Language: English
Duration: 15 minutes 23 seconds 
Twitter: @datelineSBS @MeggiePalmer 



Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 11:15
IACC Cinema

11:00

Beyond confrontation: exploring women’s empowerment and partnership strategies to increase transparency and accountability
Global discourse on the fight against corruption has historically been gender neutral, but over the past few years, the Huairou Commission and UNDP PACDE have partnered to produce evidence of the gendered impacts of corruption, as well as support grassroots women’s groups design and implement strategies to increase transparency and accountability in their communities. In 2013, the Huairou Commission’s Transparency & Accountability Initiative, with the support of UNDP PACDE, implemented six grassroots women-led pilot projects on increasing accountability and transparency in the sectors of health care, water and sanitation, electricity, land, and national identification documents.

This session will highlight on the ground experiences of grassroots women’s organizations from Nepal and Uganda as they share the impacts of their pilot studies in the water, sanitation and land sectors, with specific focus on their basic political education trainings, monitoring tools and partnership strategies as key drivers of increasing accountability and decreasing misuse of resources and power. Representatives from national branches of Transparency International will also share regional citizen monitoring mechanisms and their lessons learned for increasing access to information and empowering community-led action.

The session seeks to facilitate dialogue between grassroots women, UN agencies, government officials, women judges, and other civil society stakeholders on how to support women’s strategies for holding local authorities accountable, and identify entry points at the local level for advancing women’s participation and gender equality. It will also build lessons on how best to refine and adapt these bottom-up strategies to influence national and international level anti-corruption policies and programming, as well as how citizen monitoring mechanisms can be integrated into the means of implementing the post-2015 development goals.

Moderators
avatar for Sri Husnaini Sofjan

Sri Husnaini Sofjan

Senior Consultant - Program Administrator & Strategist, Huairou Commission

Speakers
DD

Dato' Dr. Anwar Fazal

Environmental and Anti-Corruption Activist
PT

Prof Tan Sri Dato' Dr. Sharifah Hapsah Syed Hasan

Former Vice-Chancellor of National University of Malaysia
AT

Anga Timilsina

Programme Manager, UNDP Global Anti-Corruption Initiative (GAIN)
Are winning or losing the battle against corruption? | | Anga Timilsina is the Programme Manager of the UNDP Global Anti-Corruption Initiative (GAIN) – the UNDP global initiative in response to the increasing demand for technical assistance in anti-corruption from more than 130 country offices and UNDP programming countries. Mr. Timilsina coordinates UNDP anti-corruption efforts at the global level including global advocacy and... Read More →
JW

Joan Winship

International Association of Women Judges



Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 4

11:00

From transparency to accountability – how credible information support good governance: Lessons learned and a look into the future of global multi-stakeholder transparency initiatives
The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is one of the leading examples of global multi-stakeholder transparency initiatives. Established in 2003 and governed by an international multi-stakeholder board, the initiative provides on a national basis insights into revenues coming from extractives in 48 countries in 2015. By offering a participatory multi-stakeholder platform in implementing countries, it not only helps to detect gaps in financials as reported by governments and companies, but also an enabling environment for change. As EITI, the Construction Sector Transparency Initiative (CoST) is a country centered multi-stakeholder initiative. CoST is designed to promote transparency and accountability in publicly financed construction. It was launched in 2012 after successful pilots in eight countries between 2008 and 2011.

Driven by need and inspirited by the impact of EITI and CoST, new global multi-stakeholder initiatives are currently being established for other sectors. Inspired by procedures and governance of EITI and CoST, these new initiatives seek to follow their example.

The Fisheries Transparency Initiative (FiTI) seeks to increase transparency in fisheries access in to strengthening the enabling environment for responsible fisheries management. Announced in January 2015 at a high-level conference in Mauritania – a current conceptual phase is being undertaken consulting relevant stakeholders to establish a credible FiTI standard and to enhance number of countries for implementation in 2016. Besides Mauritania which is committed to implementation in 2016, a number of other countries already show great interest incl. Costa Rica, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Senegal, the Seychelles and several small island nations in the Pacific. The first international high level FiTI conference will take place in Nouakchott / Mauritania on December 14, 2015.

The Garment Industries Transparency Initiative (GITI) aims at promoting transparency as a means to improve working conditions in global garment supply chains. Started in 2013, and guided by a multi-stakeholder Advisory Board, the GITI commissioned two feasibility studies in Myanmar and Bangladesh incl. in-country stakeholder consultations in order prepare national implementation processes starting in 2016. A regional conference in Myanmar on September 8-9, 2015 will bring together representatives from governments, garment producers, buying companies and civil society members and trade unions from Myanmar, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka.

The Climate Transparency Initiative (CTI) seeks to increase transparency in climate performance by providing independent and credible assessments by collaborating with multiple-stakeholders. Started in October 2014, CTI is currently preparing a report on G20 climate performance in order to lay ground for a common framework towards a composite climate action index.

This is the first time ever high level session held within the International Anti-Corruption Conference bringing together major global multi-stakeholder transparency initiatives. It will be unique opportunity for cross-sectoral learnings of opportunities and challenges of transparency to increase accountability ending impunity.

This panel will share insights into evolution, experience, success factors and challenges of increasing accountability within the scope of the initiatives. It will discuss how the initiatives can help shaping an enabling environment to increase accountability. Following this, panelists will share their experience what conditions need to be met in order make this initiatives driving change.

Outcomes of this session will benefit those supporting multi-stakeholder transparency endeavors. It will also highlight opportunities and challenges of establishing transparency through global multi-stakeholder initiatives. It is envisioned that this session becomes the starting point of a regular exchange of existing initiatives on learnings, synergies, common goals and challenges in order to move global multi-stakeholder transparency initiatives to the next level.

Moderators
avatar for Peter Eigen

Peter Eigen

Founder, Chair Advisory Council, Founder and Chair of the Advisory Council
Prof. Dr. Peter Eigen is a lawyer by training. He has worked in economic development for 25 years, mainly as a World Bank manager of programs in Africa and Latin America; from 1988 to 1991 he was the Director of the Regional Mission for Eastern Africa of the World Bank. Under Ford Foundation sponsorship, he provided legal and technical assistance to the governments of Botswana and Namibia. In 1993 Eigen founded Transparency International (TI... Read More →

Speakers
PC

Peter Conze

Garment Industries Transparency Initiative
avatar for Petter Matthews

Petter Matthews

Executive Director, Cost
I am a built environment and international development specialist with over thirty years’ experience. Currently I am Executive Director of the Construction Sector Transparency (CoST) initiative and Executive Director of Engineers Against Poverty. I started my career in the UK construction industry as an apprentice served bricklayer, foreman and construction manager. My work in international development began in 1989 as a Construction Manager... Read More →
avatar for Jonas Moberg

Jonas Moberg

Head of Secretariat, EITI
Jonas has documented his experience and learning from eight years of managing the EITI in a book co-written by Deputy Head, Eddie Rich: Beyond Governments: Making Collective Governance Work - Lessons from the EITI (2015). Before joining the EITI in 2007, Jonas was a Senior Advisor to the UN Global Compact. Prior to that, he was Director Corporate Policy and Practice at the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum, London, which... Read More →
SO

Sidi Ould Tah

Director General, Fisheries Transparency Initiative, Arab Bank for Economic Development in Africa
AU

Alvaro Umaña

Climate Transparency Initiative

Session Coordinators


Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 5

11:00

Governing With The Citizen: Transparent Cities and Accountable Local Governments in an Urbanizing World
Our world is becoming increasingly urban and data is staggering, by 2050 about 75% of the population will live in cities and it is estimated that most urbanites will be concentrated only in about 600 cities; when nearly 3 of each 4 will be located in developing economies. Cities already account for 60% of the world’s GDP and growing...Urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented speed and pace in the developing world, but it is also happening within a context of weak institutional and governance structures. As a result, certain sectors and services such as infrastructure development, health or education are often prone to corruption, misappropriation and, even worse on terms of quantity: inefficiency.
It is often perceived that local decision-making is at the risk of being captured by special interests, but it is also a fact that local governments are closer to the citizen, and opportunities to control and monitor local spending are often higher at the local level.
Local governments bear the responsibility of ensuring the quality of life of their citizens, but they are also increasingly responsible to respond to the people’s demands for transparency and accountability in managing the city. In the world of today, governing without the citizen is becoming nearly impossible.
But local governments need also help on to face this new challenge too, as many do not have the capacities, resources or legal tools to effectively respond to the citizen’s demand for increased participation in the city matters.
The general perception amongst the development community that local government officers are all corrupt is also not helping a new generation of young and committed local government officers to fight historically and culturally accepted behaviors. Citizens should also help their governments to function better, by checking, controlling and requesting increasing access to information, but the final result of the process should not be to build the necessary trust, as, without trust, govern is difficult, inefficient, if not impossible.
Worldwide, many mayors and governors are battling to establish a new culture of openness and efficiency in the management of their cities. One of the special areas of concern is the procurement of services by municipalities, especially in areas where high technical capacity is needed. The increase of transparency on the negotiations and implementation of Public-Private-Partnerships and the need to include the citizen in the management of basic urban services is, today, a requirement more and more necessary as the provision of basic services is key to battle urban poverty and to ensure universal access and basic quality for the more disadvantaged inhabitants of the city. The other key area is, of course, the construction sector, with specific reference to the long-term consequences that the change in land use from rural to urban has on the future shape of the city. Urban planning and licensing is particularly sensitive to corruption and a new approach to this problem needs to be provided.

The main objectives of the proposed event are:

1. To highlight innovative measures that some local governments are experimenting to improve transparency and accountability in the field of urban planning and the provision of basic services while ensuring access, quality affordability and safety in the provision of basic services, on one side, and the control over the speculative physical development of the city.

2. To discuss how national legislation and policy can influence the local level and what role civil society and the private sector can and should be to help enhance accountability and integrity

The session is co-organized by UN-Habitat (United Nations Human Settlement Program) and UCLG (United Cities and Local Governments) with the financial support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Session Sub-themes
A. Informality and service delivery: Robbing the poor of the urban advantage
B. Building urban futures: how to protect the public space in accelerated urbanization processes.
C. The cost of municipal inefficiency versus the cost of corruption. Adequate legislation and appropriate multi-level governance.
D. Contracting out: the risk of public-private-partnerships in a technologically changing world

The session is co-organized by UN-Habitat (United Nations Human Settlement Program) and UCLG (United Cities and Local Governments) with the financial support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Moderators
avatar for Huguette Labelle

Huguette Labelle

Former Chair, Expert Advisor Policy & Development, Individual Member
Huguette Labelle is the former Chair of the Board of Transparency International, member of the Board of the UN Global Compact, member of the Group of External Advisors on the World Bank Governance and Anti-corruption Strategy, member of the Advisory Group to the Asian Development Bank on Climate Change and Sustainable Development, member of the Executive Board of the Africa Capacity Building Foundation, member of the Board of the Global Centre... Read More →

Speakers
MM

Mayor Murat Aydin

Mayor, Municipality Of Zeytinburnu
avatar for ERIC CONSTANTINO

ERIC CONSTANTINO

Mayor, Municipality Of Abra De Ilog, Mindoro Occidental
I'm a lawyer, former prosecutor and in my third term as mayor of a 2nd class municipality, with almost 40% Indigenous People Population, on an island 5 hours from Manila (including a 2 hour ferry ride). Reducing poverty, malnutrition, improving delivery of basic services and health seeking behaviour of the IPs. Enhancing participative and consultative governance with CSOs and constituents.
CM

Clara Mvogo

Mayor, Monrovia City Government

Session Coordinators
avatar for Diana Lopez Caramazana

Diana Lopez Caramazana

Head, Local Government Unit, Un-Habitat, United Nations Human Settlements Progr
I have been dedicated to issues related to local governance and the role of local governments in international development since 1997 when I entered the UN System as information manager at the International Labour Organisation – ILO, providing expertise on local economic development for local governments in Latin America. In 2003 I was detached by the ILO to the Italian Ministry for Foreign Affairs, contributing to build tools for economic... Read More →

Rapporteur
DZ

Dieter Zinnbauer

Research, Transparency International - Secretariat


Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 6

11:00

Integrity is Forever: Cleaning up the Luxury Goods Trade
Luxury investments, such as in goods and real estate, are among the preferred means for corrupt individuals to hide the illicit origin of their funds. The proceeds of corruption are often used to purchase real estate, sports cars and limousines, yachts, jet planes, precious metals and jewellery and art works. By doing so, the corrupt not only enjoy the luxurious benefits of their corrupt cash, but they also translate that stolen cash into an investment that rarely loses value and can be converted (and laundered) at a later date. Luxury real-estate has been in the news a lot this year. Investigative journalists have uncovered scandals involving corrupt cash being used to purchase luxury properties in New York and London, and shedding light on real estate agents willing to make it happen. It is said that billions of dollars have exited China and bought property in high-end neighbourhoods around the world. 70% of those purchases in the US were made entirely in cash. The value of transactions in the high-end art market has ballooned and it is likely that a large part of this is attributable to the money laundering opportunities offered by the trade in these products.

Conversely, in markets where there has been greater scrutiny of corruption we have seen a fall off in the trade in luxury goods. Prada’s annual profit fell 28% last year, much of which was attributed to China’s corruption crackdown.

Are these sectors doing enough to make sure they are clean, corruption-free and not complicit?

Despite recent government attention to the problem of money laundering, the luxury goods sector still does not submit “suspicious transaction reports” commensurate with the amount of money they are handling. European Union data shows that in 2010 real estate agents submitted less than half a percent of all suspicious transaction reports.

Equally, according to the OECD 41% of OECD countries are not in compliance with anti-money laundering requirements with regards to businesses and professions such as real estate, casinos and luxury goods retailers.

Yet, a European risk report found that corruption and bribery is a top concern for senior executives in the luxury goods industry, when it comes to legal and reputational risk. And, of course, important luxury good markets – diamonds for example – have experienced the risk at first hand and have long cooperated with attempts to regulate the less salubrious elements of their trade.

So what could the real estate and luxury goods sector be doing to make sure they are clean?

What game changing ideas are there that can change the story?

Our panellists will tell their stories of how luxury, secrecy and corruption come together and propose new solutions to clean the sector up.

Moderators
avatar for David Lewis

David Lewis

Executive Director, Corruption Watch
Executive Director Corruption Watch,

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Davies

Rachel Davies

Senior Advocacy Manager, Transparency International Uk
Rachel is the Senior Advocacy Manager at Transparency International UK and heads TI-UK's communications work, as well the UK-focused advocacy on money laundering, political corruption, and open governance. She is Chair of the Bond Anti-Corruption Group, a collection of like-minded British NGOs who work on the issue of corruption, and sits on the steering group for the UK Open Governance Partnership Civil Society Network
avatar for Diana Verde Nieto

Diana Verde Nieto

Ceo And Co-Founder, Positive Luxury
Entrepreneur and game-changer Diana Verde Nieto is co-founder and CEO of Positive Luxury, the company behind the Butterfly Mark. Argentinian-born Diana is a serial entrepreneur who was nominated by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Leader, went to Harvard Kennedy School of Global Leadership and Public Policy and trained with Al Gore at the Alliance of Climate Protection. Diana is a pioneer in the sustainability sector, in 2002 she... Read More →
avatar for Natalie Sedletska

Natalie Sedletska

Author Of The Investigative Tv-Program, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
Natalie Sedletska is an investigative journalist in Ukraine now working as an author, host and editor of the investigave anticorruption TV-program Schemes: Corruption in Detail. This is a joint project of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and First Public TV-Channel of Ukraine. From 2013-2014, Sedletska was a Vaclav Havel Fellow through a joint program of RFE/RL and the Czech Republic Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She also took part as an... Read More →

Session Coordinators
avatar for Maggie Murphy

Maggie Murphy

Senior Coordinator, Global Advocacy And Policy, Transparency International
I am Senior Coordinator in the Global Advocacy and Policy team of Transparency International. I lead Transparency International's work at the G20, working with colleagues in Chapters in 19 of the G20 members, with a particular focus on financial transparency issues. Most recently, prior to working at Transparency International I worked as a UN advocate for Minority Rights Group International and in the international advocacy team of Amnesty... Read More →

Rapporteur
avatar for Alesia Nahirny

Alesia Nahirny

Executive Director, Transparency International Canada
Alesia is a lawyer and a trained mediator. She holds a Master’s degree from the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies and a Bachelor’s degree in International Relations and Peace and Conflict Studies both from the University of Toronto. Alesia obtained her law degree from the University of Ottawa and has worked for the Department of Justice both in Ottawa and Toronto. She has worked extensively in the anti-corruption field... Read More →


Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 7

11:00

Investigating Corruption: the New Muckrakers
How are new funding models and cross-border collaborations for investigative journalism affecting investigative journalism’s ability to combat corruption?

Mainstream media continue to back away from funding long-form investigative journalism and are broadening links up with organisations like ProPublica, ICIJ and 100Reporters. These new models (mostly funded by US foundations) are also often in collaboration with civil society organisations (also foundation and a sometimes government funded). There are more cross border collaborations too and great reporting has been done. Real exposure, however, is still a function of teaming up with traditional media even though the social media universe is beginning to act as a growing disseminator of this work.

This session will explore and discuss both the sustainability of this model for investigative journalism and the financial and ethical pitfalls in this approach. Is this a golden age for investigative journalists uncovering corruption? Will foundations keep up their funding? Will working with CSOs, who have their own agendas, skew the journalism? Is this different from the days of media barons setting the agenda or are we still very much party to their personal

The session will also like to tackle the role of the whistleblower: the traditional source and the data dumps. It will look at the role of data journalism in this new connected and visualisable world and how mainstream media can adapt and benefit from cross-border collaborations.

The session will:

• Explore and compare sustainable financial models to ensure investigative journalism remains a strong weapon in the anti-corruption arsenal
• Connect players with different agendas to combatting corruption via investigative journalism
• Assess the viability of philanthro-journalism in the fight against corruption


Moderators
avatar for Deborah Unger

Deborah Unger

Manager, Rapid Response Unit, TI-S

Speakers
avatar for Eva Constantaras

Eva Constantaras

Data Journalism Advisor, Internews Network
Eva Constantaras is a data and investigative journalist and a trainer specialised in cross-border journalism projects to combat corruption and encourage transparency. She has worked in Latin America, Asia and East Africa on topics ranging from displacement and kidnapping by organised crime networks to extractive industries and election violence
avatar for David Kaplan

David Kaplan

Executive Director, Global Investigative Journalism Network
David E. Kaplan is executive director of Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN), the international association of investigative reporting organizations, with 138 member groups in 62 countries. He has worked as an investigative journalist for more than 30 years, reported from two dozen countries, and won or shared more than 25 awards. He has managed nonprofit newsrooms, investigative teams, and numerous cross-border projects. During the... Read More →
avatar for Yolanda Jinxin Ma

Yolanda Jinxin Ma

Co-founder & Editor, Data Journalism China
Yolanda Jinxin Ma is a frequent international speaker & trainer on data journalism. In the past few years she has trained 200+ journalists in China on data skills. She is currently working on innovation projects with the UN in Asia Pacific region. She was previously with Reuters on data visualization and the South China Morning Post on social media.
avatar for Ron Nixon

Ron Nixon

Washington correspondent for The New York Times, New York Times/ 100reporters
Ron Nixon, chairman of the board of 100Reporters, is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the consumer beat. He previously worked as an investigative reporter for the Minneapolis Star Tribune and the Roanoke Times in Virginia. Nixon was also training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors. He is the founder of The Ujima Project, an online portal of documents and data that allows... Read More →
avatar for Paul Radu

Paul Radu

Executive Director, OCCRP
Paul Radu is the executive director of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project and a co-creator of the Investigative Dashboard concept, of Visual investigative Scenarios visualization software and of RISE Project, a new platform for investigative reporters and hackers in Romania. | | Twitter: @IDashboard

Rapporteur
avatar for Alison Coleman

Alison Coleman

Project Coordinator, Transparency International EU Liaison Office
Alison is the Project Coordinator for the European Corruption Observatory, an online database of media reports on corruption and a meeting point for journalists, hackers, experts and all those interested in corruption.


Friday September 4, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Hall 3

11:20

A screening of "No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka"

No Fire Zone is a chilling, powerful Emmy-nominated feature documentary which tells the story of the final months of the 26-year long Sri Lankan civil war. Released in 2013, this cut has been updated for 2015.

The story is told by the people who lived through the war - and through some of the most dramatic and disturbing video evidence ever seen: direct evidence of war crimes, summary execution, torture and sexual violence, recorded by both the victims and perpetrators during the final 138 days of hell which form the central narrative of the film.

No Fire Zone is directed by the Nobel Peace Prize nominee Callum Macrae, a Peabody and Colombia Dupont Broadcast Journalism Award winner and Greirson and BAFTA nominee.

No Fire Zone is something of an international phenomenon. The product of a three year investigation, it is credited with playing a key role in convincing the UN Human Rights Council in March 2014 to launch a major international war crimes investigation into these events. It is also a cinematic tour de force. It was described as "beautifully crafted and heart wrenching” by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in Washington, "utterly convincing" by the Globe and Mail in Toronto - and Empire noted: "It is vitally important that this feature reaches the widest possible audience”. One critic in Australia described it as “the most devastating film I have seen”.

It has been praised for its impact – despite an international campaign by the Sri Lankan government to ban and discredit it. British Prime Minister David Cameron said: ”No Fire Zone is one of the most chilling documentaries I’ve watched”.  Musician and Artist M.I.A said No Fire Zone is “Not only the most important account of what happened to the Tamils, its actually become part of the fabric of their history.”

Director: Callum Macrae
Editor: Michael Nollet
Language: English
Year: 2013 updated in 2015
Duration:  94 Minutes



Friday September 4, 2015 11:20 - 12:50
IACC Cinema

11:30

What you must know about online security & privacy?
Why should you care about security? You probably use internet and have exponentially growing numbers of footprints everywhere online. That makes you a potential victim of a cyber fraud - one of the fastest growing forms of crime in the world.  
Come to the session and learn about the basics of safe behavior online. 



Speakers
avatar for Lesedi Bewlay

Lesedi Bewlay

Regional coordinator for Southern Africa, The Engine Room (Civil Society)
Lesedi is an entrepreneur with a background in computer science, non-governmental organizations and a strong interest in social change. Currently based in Botswana, Lesedi is working with the engine room to design plans and guidelines for the roll out of the matchbox project in Southern Africa. Within this role, he manages relationships between experts and advocacy organizations in the region. The goal of the matchbox project is to create long... Read More →



Friday September 4, 2015 11:30 - 13:00
Technology Hub * Hall 8

13:00

Lunch
Friday September 4, 2015 13:00 - 14:30
Perdana Hall

14:30

Plenary IV: Don't Let Them Get Away With It: Investigating & Exposing the Truth
Now more than ever ordinary citizens, journalists and advocates from all fields have the necessary tools to blow the whistle on corruption. A few clicks can enable anyone to expose corruption globally; an emerging culture of collaboration allows investigative journalists to uncover systemic international corruption cases while advocates from around the world increasingly use journalism style investigations to strengthen their advocacy work. But despite this progress, or perhaps because of this progress, the risks for those who speak out are bigger than ever. Effective collaboration between these groups remains weak.

The purpose of this session is twofold: By identifying the main barriers that prevent citizens, journalists and advocates from working together more effectively this session aims to produce concrete recommendations for the global community at large to take on. In looking at supporting those who speak out against corruption the session will identify concrete actions the global community needs to embrace in order to reverse an increasingly dangerous national and international environment.

Watch the live stream here. 

Moderators
avatar for Jess Search

Jess Search

Chief Executive, BRITDOC Foundation
Jess Search is Chief Executive of the BRITDOC Foundation which, in partnership with the Bertha Foundation, gives funding and support to award winning documentary journalism such as CITIZENFOUR , Virunga, No Fire Zone, The Square, Dirty Wars. In partnership with the Ford Foundation and Sundance Institute the Foundation created and runs The Good Pitch which partners films with NGOs, foundations and brands at events in Nairobi, Jakarta, Sydney... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Beatrice Edwards

Beatrice Edwards

International Program Director, Former Executive Director, Government Accountability Project
avatar for Dunja Mijatovic

Dunja Mijatovic

Representative On Freedom Of The Media, Organisation For Security And Cooperation In Europ
Dunja Mijatovic, an expert in media law and regulation from Bosnia and Herzegovina, was appointed Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Representative on Freedom of the Media in early 2010. In 1998, as one of the founders of the Communications Regulatory Agency of Bosnia and Herzegovina she helped create a legal, regulatory and policy framework for the media in a complex post-war society. She was also involved in... Read More →
avatar for Joanna Natasegara

Joanna Natasegara

Producer, Violet Films
Joanna is a multi award-winning Producer, Impact Producer and Founder of Violet Films  Violet is both a production company and an ethical consultancy specialising in bespoke outreach campaigns and maximising the social change potential for film and media projects. Joanna has extensive experience in documentary film having directed and produced documentaries covering social justice and politics including criminal justice reform, peace and... Read More →




Friday September 4, 2015 14:30 - 16:00
Plenary Hall

16:00

Coffee Break
Friday September 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Green Concourse Foyer

16:30

Plenary V: Grand Corruption: How to Stop the Corrupt Stealing from You and Me
To end impunity for corruption what international structural changes need to take place? What kind of collaboration between sectors and countries is still needed? How can we ensure a safe environment for people of integrity to take action against impunity for corruption?

The closing plenary session will take stock of the outcomes from the previous plenary sessions and outline what needs to change in order to address the greatest global challenge of all: Impunity for corruption.

Watch the live stream here. 

Moderators
avatar for Frank Vogl

Frank Vogl

Co-founder, Individual Member
For more than 40 years, as a journalist, as a World Bank senior official, as an anti-corruption civil society leader, Frank has been engaged with global economics, banking, governance and anti-corruption. Co-founder and former Vice Chairman/Advisor to the Managing Director/Member of the Advisory Council – Transparency International (TI) | Co-founder/Member of the Board of Directors and former Vice Chairman – Partnership for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim

Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim

Chairman, Anti-Corruption Advisory Board of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission
Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim has held senior management positions in large private and public sector organisations in Malaysia, Hong Kong and the UK. | | He began his business career with the Guthrie Corporation Ltd., after completing his tertiary education in England and Australia. He then moved to the Central Bank of Malaysia as Advisor. He returned to the private sector, his preferred option, joining Dunlop Malaysian Industries before being... Read More →
avatar for Jean-Louis Nadal

Jean-Louis Nadal

President, French High Authority for transparency in public life
Jean-Louis Nadal was appointed President of the High Authority for the Transparency of Public Life by decree of the President of the Republic in December 2013, after his nomination was approved by the Committees of the laws of the French Assemblée Nationale and by the French Senate. M. Nadal is also the Honorary Attorney General at the French Court of Cassation. | | Having studied at theEcole Nationale de la Magistrature, and with a... Read More →
avatar for Simon Peh

Simon Peh

Commissioner, Icac, Hong Kong
Simon Peh joined the Hong Kong Immigration Department as an Immigration Officer in April 1978 after graduating from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.  He studied public policy and administration at the Graduate School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley in 1991-92.  He attended the Royal College of Defence in London in 2001 and was awarded a Master Degree in International Relations by the King’s College London.  He was... Read More →
avatar for Salil Shetty

Salil Shetty

Secretary General, Amnesty International
Salil Shetty joined Amnesty International as the organization’s eighth Secretary General in July 2010. A long-term activist on poverty and justice, he leads the movement’s worldwide work to end human rights violations. Prior to joining Amnesty International, Shetty was Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign from 2003 to 2010. He played a pivotal role in building the global advocacy campaign for the achievement of the Millennium... Read More →
avatar for Cobus De Swardt

Cobus De Swardt

Managing Director, TI-S
Cobus joined Transparency International in 2004 and was appointed Managing Director in 2007. His experience spans the fields of globalisation, development policy, international relations and business management. Cobus has taught and worked at universities, multinational corporations, trade unions and research institutes in managerial and research related roles around the world. During the 1980s and early 1990s, he was active in the anti-apartheid... Read More →




Friday September 4, 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Plenary Hall

18:15

Conference closing, adoption of Declaration
The Closing Ceremony of the 16th International Anti-Corruption Conference, and the signing of the Conference Declaration.

Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim bin Mohamed,
Chief Commissioner of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission
Elena Panfilova,
Vice-Chair, Transparency International
Akere Muna,
Chair of the IACC Council
Dato' Akhbar Satar,
President of Transparency International Malaysia
The Honourable Senator Dato' Sri Abdul Wahid Omar, Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Government of Malaysia

Watch the live stream here.  

Speakers
avatar for Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim bin Mohamed

Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim bin Mohamed

Chief Commissioner, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC)
Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim Mohamed is the current Chief Commissioner of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC). He was born in Kuala Lumpur on 5 December 1960. He possessed vast experience and knowledge in public service. Tan Sri Dr. Abu Kassim joined the civil service in September 1984 upon completing his degree in Social Sciences from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Penang. Upon entry into the civil service, he was posted to the then... Read More →
avatar for Akere Muna

Akere Muna

Chairperson, IACC Council
Akere Muna, founder and former President of TI Cameroon, is a lawyer by training. He is the former President of the African Union’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council (2008-2014), former President of the Pan African Lawyers Union (2006-2014), and former President of the Cameroon Bar Association (1997-2002). In 2007 he was appointed member of the High level Panel on the Audit of the African Union, then Chairperson of the African Union. In... Read More →
TH

The Honourable Senator Dato' Sri Abdul Wahid Omar

Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Government of Malaysia
Dato’ Sri Abdul Wahid Omar, aged 49, was appointed as a Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department in charge of Economic Planning on 5th June 2013. He oversees a number of government agencies such as Economic Planning Unit, Public-Private partnership Unit (UKAS), Department of Statistics, Ekuiti Nasional Berhad (EKUINAS) and Talent Corporation (TALENCORP), TERAJU and Yayasan Pendidikan Peneraju Bumiputera. Prior to his... Read More →
avatar for Elena Panfilova

Elena Panfilova

Vice Chair, Transparency International
Elena A. Panfilova is the chair of the Center for Anti-corruption Research and Initiative Transparency International, TI’s Russian chapter, which she founded in 1999. She served as its Executive Director until July 2014, when she became the Chapter’s Chair. She has been an academic, consultant and activist, held positions in the OECD and the Institute for Economy in Transition, and became a member of the Russian Governmental... Read More →



Friday September 4, 2015 18:15 - 19:15
Plenary Hall

19:15